All Posts by Date or last 15, 30, 90 or 180 days.
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases @AMAZON

Designed for the most demanding needs of photographers and videographers.
The fastest, toughest, and most compatible portable SSD ever with speeds up to 2800MB/s.

ChatGPT: Calculating EV Charging Power Requirements

re: ChatGPT
re: Mercedes eSprinter, GM EV Trucks: Science Fair Projects Requiring Fantasy Infrastructure Buildout

I did the math myself, but I wanted to see if ChatGPT could do it, as it is reported to do poorly at math. It got the math right, matching my own calculations.

Q: If an EV requires 350 kW to charge, how many kW are needed for 10 EVs?

A: To charge 10 EVs, you would need a total of 3500 kW (350 kW per EV * 10 EVs).

Q: At 800V, how many amps would be needed, per EV?

A: To calculate the current (amps) required to charge an EV, you need to know the voltage and the power. If an EV requires 350 kW to charge at 800V, then you can calculate the current using the formula:

Power (Watts) = Voltage (Volts) x Current (Amps)

Therefore,

Current (Amps) = Power (Watts) / Voltage (Volts)

So,

Current (Amps) = 350,000 / 800

= 437.5 Amps

So, per EV, you would need 437.5 Amps at 800V to charge it.

Q: How many gigawatts generating capacity for the US power grid?

A: As of 2021, the total generating capacity of the US power grid was approximately 1,131 gigawatts (GW). However, this number is constantly changing as new power plants are built and older ones are retired, so the current generating capacity may be different.

Q: If one million new EVs were added, how much generating capacity would be needed to charge them at 115 kW each, simultaneously?

To calculate the total generating capacity required to charge one million new EVs simultaneously, you need to know the power required per EV and the number of EVs. If each EV requires 115 kW to charge, and there are one million new EVs, then you can calculate the total power as follows:

Total Power (Watts) = Power per EV (Watts) x Number of EVs

Therefore,

Total Power (Watts) = 115 x 10^3 x 1,000,000

= 115,000,000,000 Watts

= 115 GW

So, to charge one million new EVs simultaneously, a total generating capacity of 115 GW would be needed.

Q: If the US adds 10 million new EVs that on average charge at 50 kW each, how much generating capacity is needed to charge them simultaneously?

A: To calculate the total generating capacity required to charge 10 million new EVs simultaneously, you need to know the power required per EV and the number of EVs. If each EV requires 50 kW to charge, and there are 10 million new EVs, then you can calculate the total power as follows:

Total Power (Watts) = Power per EV (Watts) x Number of EVs

Therefore,

Total Power (Watts) = 50 x 10^3 x 10,000,000

= 500,000,000,000 Watts

= 500 GW

So, to charge 10 million new EVs simultaneously, a total generating capacity of 500 GW would be needed.

Q: What if the charging were spread across a 12-hour period?

A: If the charging of the 10 million new EVs were spread across a 12-hour period, the total generating capacity required would be lower than if they were charged all at once. This is because the power grid does not need to produce the maximum charging power for all EVs simultaneously, but can instead produce it at a lower, more manageable rate over a longer period of time.

To determine the actual generating capacity required, you would need to know the charging schedule and pattern of the EVs, which would affect the total power demand on the grid. However, spreading the charging over a 12-hour period would likely result in a lower overall generating capacity requirement compared to charging all 10 million EVs simultaneously.

Q: Be specific.

A: It is difficult to give a specific answer without more information on the charging pattern and schedule of the 10 million EVs. However, as a rough estimate, if the charging were spread evenly over a 12-hour period, the average power demand per hour would be:

Total Power (Watts) = 500,000,000,000 / 12 hours

= 41,666,666,667 Watts per hour

= 41.7 GW per hour

This is an average power demand, and the actual peak power demand could be higher or lower depending on the specific charging pattern and schedule. To determine the exact generating capacity required, a more detailed analysis of the charging demand would need to be conducted.

Q: Is it realistic to increase total US generating capacity by 24% within 10 years?

A: An error occurred. If this issue persists please contact us through our help center at help.openai.com.

View all handpicked deals...

FUJIFILM GF 20-35mm f/4 R WR Lens
$2499 $1999
SAVE $500

diglloyd.com | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY
Contact | About Lloyd Chambers | Consulting | Photo Tours
Mailing Lists | RSS Feeds | X.com/diglloyd
Copyright © 2020 diglloyd Inc, all rights reserved.
Display info: __RETINA_INFO_STATUS__