Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

2018 Davis Double: Strong Headwinds, Moderate Heat, Force of Will Gets it Done with a Little Help from a Pool and Ice

Due to the concussion, I missed the Southern Inyo Spring Double, Mulholland Double, and Devil Mountain Double*, resuming with the Central Coast Double, which has not only reduced my potential competitiveness, but the concussion is having lingering effects.

See the 2018 Davis Double course map.

Update on recovery: just 42 hours after finishing I had zero soreness and nearly full strength (power meter does not lie!) which is pretty amazingly fast recovery. It is not full recovery, but very close and typically recovery has been 4-5 days after a double, so that is a very large improvement. I attribute this to two products I am using, one a PEMF device that accelerates micro circulation, and the other a protein source ideal for feeding hard-used muscles, Primal Feast hydrolized beef protein powder. More on both as I confirm recovery with a few more doubles.

...

I was not feeling very well the 3 days prior to the Davis Double Century on May 19, and even Friday I was poorly rested needing two naps—not a good sign. That, and some large fast-growing nodules that I wanted checked out—pretty sure they are just lymph nodes but one 40mm X 10mm X 5mm one in my groin was a nuisance while riding. Two more in my neck. Arriving after dark, I could not sleep until 2:30 AM (probably a symptom of the prior 3 days whatever was bothering me), then I was awoken at 3:52 AM by arriving cars, then 4 AM by my alarm. So it was not a good staging, though without sleep one still does rest.

Starting out, I felt fluid and smooth but power was 30 watts below expectations*. I was at ease, just not riding all that strong, which is what I expected having felt tired the prior 3 days and what with nearly zero sleep. After 50 miles of warmup (yes, 50), I finally began to feel terrific, passing hundreds of riders, until mile 110 or so, where the same thing happened as with Central Coast Double: a marked drop in energy in spite of paying close attention to feeding and hydration. Still, I found I could out-climb a pair of strong riders who had been pacelining each other; they outran me downhill as I stopped to down half a liter at the summit but they had bad luck (flat tire**), and I then left them far behind; even at the Resurrection rest stop (mile 132) they did not show up and I never saw them again.

* A highly accurate power meter provides objective feedback that over the years is an invaluable reality-checking tool, whether power output be low or high, whether there be wind or a climb or whatever—watts are watts.

** Funny, I ride tubular tires with the Veloflex Vlaanderen the only tire I now ride. I’ve had 2 or 3 flats in 36 double centuries (and 3 pothole tire ruptures but those don’t count as that will destroy any tire and maybe the wheel too, I’ve destroyed two wheels that way), but tubeless and clincher/tube riders seem to have far more flat tires. I carry a spare tubular and sometimes two. It is not a big deal for the relatively rare flat tire and the Vlaanderen seems to shrug off just about anything with its 320 TPI casing.

Quite strong winds the last 50 miles and me soloing as always (no drafting) took their toll, but again as with Central Coast Double, I repeated my mantra: “just keep turning the crank”. It was not very pleasant, but there is nothing else to be done since quitting is not an option. I did take a few short breaks, including ~5 minutes at Resurrection rest stop (mile 132) where I felt weak and wobbly, having overheated on the climb. I rested for ~5 minutes while I had an ice cold Mountain Dew, something I indulge in only during double centuries as it gives the liver something to do (fructose) and also has caffeine and cold. Strong headwinds on the downhill stuff slowed me down considerably. It was a lonely ride at that point, catching only a handful or riders in 50 miles (but also passing 20 or so at the Guinda rest stop).

It was not particularly hot but the humidity was oppressively high, and I overheated by mile 150. Once core body temperature rises, power output plummets. I dunked myself in a play pool and splashing water over my head and upper back at the Guinda rest stop (mile 158), loaded my jersey pocket with ice, and drank a liter of cold Nuun. More ice at the final rest stop (Forbes Ranch) and that time slathering it all over my belly too. It helps a lot, yet almost no one bothers—weird to forgo a brief but very helpful way to lower body temperature.

There were at least 391 entrants for the double century though some modest number were women not men. At Resurrection rest stop (mile 132), I was told that 13 double century riders had been through, but everyone leaves whenever they like and I left at the last possible cutoff time (5:15 AM). At around mile 36, a pacelining group of ~20 riders passed me (with that size group half the time one is coasting not even pedaling!), but I am certain that I passed nearly all of those within the next 50 miles, because I recognized many of them as passed them later (such groups always break up on the hills). I observed one group of double riders completely short-circuit some miles of the route, presumably a mistake in navigation.

Since Davis Double does not post elapsed times (only finishing time and no start time), I cannot say where I stand on the final results, but I think it is unlikely that of the 13 ahead of me that all of them did it faster. I was bib #405, so of men worst case #14 out of 300+ men. Still, I consider the day a mediocre performance, far below my performance at Joshua Tree. I think the concussion is holding me back, hopefully it will improve and I will be able to ride strong for 200 miles as at Joshua Tree sometime this year, if only the last double of the year!

Next up: Eastern Sierra Double on June 2. This one will be really difficult: I will have to drive 8 hours until 11 at night (June 1 is a graduation ceremony for my daughter), then get up at 4:30 AM. So... a stressful night with little rest and zero time to acclimate. That should prove 'interesting', and sometimes the body clock just works and it is OK. But it is the long demanding drive that is the real deal-killer.

I took only one lousy picture. I forgot (again) to get a picture at the finish—I had no other thought than lying down and taking a nap, which I did for 2-3 hours. Then I drove home at about 9:30 PM. Note that the iPhone uses GMT +0 for the time for HEIC files, a huge nuisance; this is NOT midnight or so.

Lloyd before the start of the 2018 Davis Double
f1.8 @ 1/4 sec, ISO 125; 2018-05-19 12:13:53 [selfie]
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0 mm f/1.8

[low-res image for bot]

 

Concussion Guidelines: Pure Rest is a Bad Idea

I suffered a moderate to severe concussion in a bike crash at mile 87 of the Solvang Spring Double Century:

Lloyd’s Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI / concussion) Experience and Log

A few weeks ago, I told two of my doctors that I felt that I knew more about recovery from concussion than just about every neurologist. I meant it and I still think that’s true. One does not have to be a doctor to have a high level of self awareness, and of how critical attitude and the mind and the body are—a synergistic whole, not a bag of parts. No person (or doctor) can have more than an a dim inkling of the complex physical and mental situation of another individual, particularly a highly self aware individual—I paid very close attention to myself (greatly heightened by the concussion), and that was my guideline for my own healing.

The medical profession is finally (this is 2018 isn’t it?) starting to figure out what took me all of two weeks: exercise made me feel better (and the best of the day), every day and for the rest of the day after it. That is, after the acute phase (in my case, about 10 days)—a critical point.

It is my unshakable belief that riding my bike every day for 80 to 120 minutes sped up my recovery remarkably—good enough for a win 8 weeks later in a grueling double century.

New concussion guidelines updated to eliminate one key component: prolonged rest

May 17, 2017: BUFFALO – Prolonged rest is not ideal when it comes to treating concussion, and in fact, those who are active faster, appear to get better faster. This is an idea that John Leddy, MD, director of the University at Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic, first proposed about 10 years ago, and now, he says, several studies later, is beginning to be confirmed. It is also an idea that is now reflected in the latest document that guides treatment when it comes to sport-related concussion.
...

The old guidelines indicated that individuals should not return to activity until they were asymptomatic. Until that time, the individual was told to do nothing. “This was known as ‘cocoon therapy’,” Leddy says, “That was how the old guidelines were interpreted and patients were resting, literally being told to do nothing, until they were asymptomatic. The problem with that was even non-concussed people often have some symptoms on any given day.

“The guidelines were good at keeping kids from participating at activities that risk another head injury before recovery, but were being interpreted to recommend that any level of exertion was detrimental to the brain. We now know that interpretation was wrong. All over the world, the treatment of complete rest was prolonging symptoms in many people.”
...

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

Central Coast Double Century: Won Highland Route, Exactly 8 Weeks After My Crash/Concussion

Due to the concussion, I missed the Southern Inyo Spring Double, Mulholland Double, and Devil Mountain Double*, resuming with the Central Coast Double.

Exactly 8 weeks after my concussion, I won the grueling Highland route of the Central Coast Double Century. [see official web site of Central Coast Double]. The 2018 Central Coast Double results were not posted as I write this and I might even get listed wrong at first, but I have confirmed with the race director.

I drew down all my reserves to finish with a decent time, which meant extra sleep (naps) were needed the next two days to recover. I definitely am not yet back at full strength post-concussion, but I had to laugh with joy at the effortless pacing of a 4-man pacelining group 100 yards ahead or so (so I needn’t bother checking turns)—spinning seemingly effortlessly—a wonderful feeling. My aerobic power output has never been higher in my life I think—I can trundle along nearly all aerobically at ~230 watts or so at ~128 bpm. I consumed 1600 calories the entire ride, burning 8000 calories so that’s 20% of the 'burn'—on the low side. That group disappeared behind me at about mile 60, and even though I slowed down to give them a chance to catch me, they had burned too many matches** and I never saw them again.

At about mile 104, I had to push through some mild brain fatigue (concussion related, I am sure). This mostly vaporized by careful intake of glucose sources (mainly GU energy gel), but I drew upon all my experience and willpower and focused on keeping blood glucose steady and staying hydrated and steady pacing. Still, I lost more power than I’d have liked.

Next up: Davis Double on May 19.

* Since my concussion recovery precluded participating in the Devil Mountain Double which is the first of this year’s California Triple Crown, I’m out of the running for that triplet.

** “burning a match” means over-exerting beyond what is recoverable. Many, many riders do this: 350 watts up a small rise, then drop 200 watts, then do it again. After 20 or 30 times, they’re toast, I pass them and never see them again. A power meter is a tool that can teach oneself not to burn out, by showing power output. I try to keep it steady in the 210 to 270 watt range, bumping up to the high end only when forced to by grade, and cruising at 230 to 250 watts when it feels good (the first 100 miles or so).

I’ll revise this table soon...

Double Century schedule for 2018

 

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First Look: the Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset with Veloflex Vlaanderen 27C Tires

The Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim tubular wheelset delivers the best handling and overall performance I’ve ever ridden—and that’s saying a lot given my other Lightweight tubular wheelsets.

The Veloflex Vlaanderen as shown mounts with a perfect fit on the 24mm-wide rim (rims on other Lightweight wheels are 20mm wide), as if the wheelset and tires were expressly made for each other. See pictures below; the new bike below is the 2018 Moots Vamoots RSL, sponsorship courtesy of OWC / MacSales.com (decals not yet applied).

The 24mm rims are ultra stable and the braking seems better and the total ride quality is a major upgrade. More to come over the next few weeks.

2018 Moots Vamoots RSL titanium bike sporting Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset shod with Veloflex Vlaanderen Tubular Tires
f9 @ 1/6 sec, ISO 64; 2018-05-03 14:06:14
NIKON D850 + Zeiss Milvus 1.4/35 ZF.2

[low-res image for bot]
Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset with Veloflex Vlaanderen 27C Tires
f1.8 @ 1/120 sec, ISO 25; 2018-05-07 01:23:15
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0 mm f/1.8

[low-res image for bot]
Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset with Veloflex Vlaanderen 27C Tires
f1.8 @ 1/120 sec, ISO 32; 2018-05-07 01:23:46
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0 mm f/1.8

[low-res image for bot]
Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset with Veloflex Vlaanderen 27C Tires
f1.8 @ 1/120 sec, ISO 25; 2018-05-07 01:24:34
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0 mm f/1.8

[low-res image for bot]
Lightweight Mielenstein Schwarz Edition 24mm-wide-rim Tubular Wheelset with Veloflex Vlaanderen 27C Tires
f1.8 @ 1/1050 sec, ISO 20; 2018-05-05 00:03:56
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0 mm f/1.8

[low-res image for bot]

 

Extreme Exercise May Induce Low-Level Arteriolosclerosis

I’ve long stated here that I count cycling as a major health benefit, both physically and mentally, and the more time goes on, the more strongly that idea is supported by the evidence of my own decades of self-monitoring.

Still, I had not ruled out some possible downsides. Those include development of an irregular heartbeat (which I’ve experienced under extreme training loads, gone when backing off).

But what I had not considered was low-level arteriosclerosis. Recently I had a CT heart calcium scan* score of 91 which is the 88th percentile for my age range (99 is the worst). That was a bit shocking and disappointing; I was expecting something like 0 to 5.

* I had the scan done because during my concussion, a CT scan of my head showed calcification in two major arteries in my brain.

So I saw a cardiologist and had my carotid arteries and heart scanned. They showed low level arteriosclerosis. However, my femoral arteries, listened-to by the cardiologist, have no auditory evidence of any issue.

The cardiologist pointed me to a study which suggests that the trauma of high volumes of intense exercise can induce low-level arteriosclerosis. As I understand it, the volume of blood being pushed through with great force in essence can irritate the artery walls, and this causes low-level inflammation, which leads to arteriosclerosis.

Still, one gets all the upsides of exercise, so this theoretical downside concerns me little.

Relationship Between Lifelong Exercise Volume and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Athletes

Conclusions: Participants in the >2000 MET-min/wk group had a higher prevalence of CAC and atherosclerotic plaques. The most active group, however, had a more benign composition of plaques, with fewer mixed plaques and more often only calcified plaques. These observations may explain the increased longevity typical of endurance athletes despite the presence of more coronary atherosclerotic plaque in the most active participants.

My minimum daily workout is about 1000 calories (kilocalories) at the crank = ~4000 KCal physiologically, assuming a physiological efficiency of 25% (I am 99% sure that I am at 25% or even 26% or 27%, based on the long habit of calculating calories to the gram of food, and my SRM power meter with at most 1% error).

MET (metabolic equivalent) = kcal / kg / hours

Note that "weight in kg" is just plain silly as it has a very large margin of error—8% body fat or 28%?

If I have this right, my base workout is as follows:

(4000 kg / 80 kg / (84 min/60 min/hour) ) = 35 MET hours = 2100 MET minutes per week (MINIMUM)

That’s just baseline. Back in January/February, I was doing about 2.5X that amount for 4 weeks, for example this day.

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

Death Valley Road, near Big Pine, CA

Returning home from my 4 week trip in which I was recovering from my concussion, I did a portion of this climb (about 1500 vertical feet), which is much less than the ~2500 vertical for the full climb. But it was all I had in me that day, the concussion causing brain-fade still at that time.

It’s a terrific climb, and for those with more energy, descend to the junction then climb 6000' to Schulman Grove at 10,200'. Both are part of the Everest Challenge.

Death Valley Road near Big Pine, CA

 

Vascular Therapy for Faster Recovery After Workouts, Faster Healing, etc

This post directly relates to three keen interests of mine: endurance/hard-core cycling, overall health and well-being, and recovery from my severe concussion, for which effects still linger and I expect will do so for some months, even though I feel normal most of the time now.

For many years now, I’ve written in my cycling blog about my view that cycling preserves youth and health in various ways, a theory of mine now proven specifically with cyclists.

To be photographers and to live well, we have to be healthy, because without health little else matters. So while this post is ostensibly “off topic”, it is actually very much on topic for anyone who wants to be out and about making images, particularly me (landscape photography with rigorous hikes).

My working theory as to why cycling (or similar exercise) is beneficial has been twofold: (1) it increases blood flow throughout the body, flushing out toxins and delivering oxygen and nutrients to all tissues of the body, and (2) it increases muscle tone and strength and quantity, and reduces body fat, particularly visceral fat. Not to mention endorphins, which is why after 200 miles I can feel great., as with the first two double centuries this year.

Exciting new vascular therapy

Very recently I ordered a class 1 medical device (no prescription needed, class 2a in Europe) that provides vascular therapy by greatly increasing blood flow in the smallest capillaries in the body. This increased flow supports the body’s own healing processes for anything that can benefit from increased blood flow. Medically proven in double-blind studies and with many case study papers, it is no gimmick, and it hugely outperforms devices operating on a “similar” technology, as proven in testing against 5 other devices.

My interest started out very simply: a personal one in treating myself. However, readers of my cycling blog know that the interest goes beyond personal, as per the hundreds of health-related posts in my cycling blog.

Regardless of whether it is prevention, regeneration, healing and recovery processes, improving the effectiveness of medication, preventing unnatural aging processes or increasing physical or mental performance—all of these body processes are directly related to the effectiveness of microcirculation.

Thus any activity or device that improves microcirculation in effect is a turbo boost to the body’s own mechanisms—not a cure, not a solution in itself, but an acceleration of internal physiological processes. Sedentary or injured people or anyone unable to exercise regularly and vigorously should find it particularly intriguing. Athletes like myself should find it highly beneficial in clearing out lactic acid and similar waste byproducts after a hard workout, as well as repairing overused muscle tissue. There are many other potential benefits, but I am not allowed to make such claims, only to refer to proven studies and such. Thus the generalizations. But consider that any kind of tissue repair requires a healthy blood flow; consider the diabetic amputee, the Olympic or casual athlete, the wound that won’t heal.

Getting a demo / getting one

It is my view that this device can improve the quality of life, considerably so for some people. In this regard it is compelling to me: improving my own health and well-being and that of others is a mission to be proud of. It is/was my original founding principle for founding this web site: helping myself by helping others. Different areas, same principle.

Why don’t I name this device? Well, I like this device so much that I have become an independent reseller of it, so I want the sale—I benefit if you buy one via a commission and/or if you yourself become an independent reseller. Put simply, I want (and need) to make money, and I hugely prefer to make it by helping people in some way. That’s why this site still exists after a decade—it does both.

If you are in the bay area and would like a personal demo, contact me. If you are not in the San Francisco bay area, we could talk on the phone. My time is valuable, so serious interest only please.

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

Concussion aka Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI): Experience Report and Advice, Ongoing

The terms “mild” and “traumatic” are a curious combination. I would not say what I have experienced is mild. But what is meant is that most concussions are mild compared to massive loss of function that cripples people in debilitating ways, sometimes permanently. But there is a lot of hope that the brain, being neuroplastic, has powerful ways of healing itself, if appropriate steps are taken.

I have added a new section on concussion: how it happened, initial (lack of) diagnosis, a chronological log of how I felt, how I dealt with it, ideas on nutrition and information, nervous system stimulation, medical massage, exercise, etc.

I have formed my own views based on what works/worked for me and share them. I hope this might help others dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) both in actionable ideas and in giving hope.

Lloyd’s Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI / concussion) Experience and Log

If you have just experienced a concussion, start with a positive attitude! Read Concussion: What to expect, and Setting Expectations and then Concussion: Post-Crash Acute Phase. My March 27 entry emphasizes the importance of both adding and removing sensory perceptions, e.g., excessive noise.

I never engaged in self-pity or anger, and I expected a full recovery, and I think that was important to recovery. Set aside hope, and replace it with positive expectations—the brain is a powerful thing. See April 10 Do NOT hope for the best, expect it!.

mTBI is a very complex subject for which modern medicine has few solid answers, if any, along with decades of entrenched and false “knowledge”. This is beginning to change, fortunately. IMO, the reluctance of the medical profession to accept treatment as valid absent harmful A/B placebo studies I feel does far more harm than good.

The concept of neuroplasticity is key— the brain can be trained. The worst thing you can do is to accept anyone’s claims that you are stuck with your condition. That includes doctors, many of whom are not only poorly informed about concussion (even neurologists!), but are hassled and harried by today’s medical system. My own internist tells me that there are zero (0) concussion gurus in the San Francisco Bay Area, and it is a major population center!

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Emerging Research Shows that Health and Wellness Starts with Diet and Exercise and Sleep

Garbage in = garbage out. That is, if the inputs are bad (unhealthy food, sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep) then it is virtually a guarantee of poor health.

What’s the point of living a long time if one’s body is not functioning well, so that living becomes incapacity and/or suffering and/or deprived of simply joys?

Emerging research on many fronts addresses brain and nervous system health, cardiovascular health, the immune system, etc. It’s all fascinating stuff. This has been my thesis for some years here on this web site, namely that exercise (cycling for me) and diet are critical. So is sleep, but that can be a tougher nut.

My hope is that Big Pharma and its quest for blockbuster pills does not hurt more people than it has already, by training people to think in terms of pills-are-the-answer—because most of the time, they are not. If all of obese and sedentary America got out and exercised 30 minutes a day and ate a healthy diet, I wonder how many hundreds of billions of dollars would be saved each year. Food and exercise are the best medicine of all.

See also:

Blindness cure?

The *brain* can be a root cause of blindness (not the eyes or not just the eyes). However, sometimes the eyes can be the issue; see Could THIS be a cure for blindness? Revolutionary technique restores the vision of two patients who were unable to read even with glasses.

The title should really be “could this be the cure for one type of blindness”, of course.

- The groundbreaking procedure treats age-related macular degeneration.
- It is the most common cause of blindness - striking 600,000 in the UK
- Both patients were unable to read before the procedure - but could after
- A team of British doctors inserted a patch of stem cells into their retinas

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

The claimed discovery of a new organ and one larger than any other known organ is flabbergasting. I believe that acupuncture works based on a stunning cure for me: a one-treatment cure of a 6 months problem some years ago. This new finding lens support to the basis for acupuncture being real and based on anatomical structures.

Structure and Distribution of an Unrecognized Interstitium in Human Tissues

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

A study published in Scientific Reports on Tuesday suggests that a previously unknown organ has been found in the human body. More astonishingly, the paper puts forth the idea that this new organ is the largest by volume among all 80 organs—if what the researchers found is, in fact, an organ.

How could what’s being termed as the largest organ in our body escape notice for so long? A dogged trio of researchers stumbled upon it—despite the fact that they argue it’s a crucial part of our bodies and been there all along, right in front of us. It’s an astounding find—but not without controversy.

Along with brain hacking, the future looks bright for new approaches to debilitating medical issues.

A study published in Scientific Reports on Tuesday suggests that a previously unknown organ has been found in the human body. More astonishingly, the paper puts forth the idea that this new organ is the largest by volume among all 80 organs—if what the researchers found is, in fact, an organ. How could what’s being termed as the largest organ in our body escape notice for so long? A dogged trio of researchers stumbled upon it—despite the fact that they argue it’s a crucial part of our bodies and been there all along, right in front of us. It’s an astounding find—but not without controversy.

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Hacking the Brain and Nervous System

The claimed discovery of a new organ and one larger than any other known organ is flabbergasting. I personally believe that acupuncture works (for me, a one-day cure of a 6 months problem some years ago), and this new finding finally gives credence to why it works.

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

My interest in brain hacking has grown since my concussion journey, which made clear to me just how sensitive yet “plastic” the brain is. See for example the discussion of tDCS and PoNS in my Concussion Recovery Phase 2 page.

Here’s a fascinating example of “brain hacking” which like tDCS and PoNS uses electricity.

In Electrical Pulses and Neural Code Boost Memory Storage:

By artificially replicating the neural firing involved in correct memory formation, researchers improved memory by 35 percent.

Researchers have figured out how to strengthen the storage of new memories in the human brain using electrical stimulation and neural patterns that were previously used to store other memories.

In case that sentence didn’t get stored properly in your own brain, we’ll say it another way: Scientists now have the power—using electrical impulses—to improve storage of new information in the human brain.

The report, published last week in the Journal of Neural Engineering, is the first to crack the neural codes linked to specific, individual memories in the human hippocampus, says Robert Hampson, a professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, who co-authored the report. The research is one of several approaches that could one day lead to “brain prostheses” to fill in for lost memory.

Add in other technologies like a cold laser for nerve stimulation as well as ultrasound to stimulatiespinal nerves for controlling pain and the vagus nerve for epilepsy and depression, and the future of brain and nervous system hacking looks very promising for reversing debilitating conditions.

Like anything else, technologies can be misused: erasure and alteration issues, memory destruction, etc are all ethical issues that arise.

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

Concussion aka Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI): Experience Report and Advice, Ongoing

First of all “mild” and “traumatic” are a curious combination. I would not say what I have experienced is mild. But what is meant is that most concussions are mild compared to massive injury that cripples people in debilitating ways.

I have added a new section on concussion: how it happened, initial (lack of) diagnosis, a chronological log of how I felt, how I dealt with it, ideas on nutrition and information, and so on. It is a very complex subject for which modern medicine has few solid answers, if any.

Accordingly, I hope this might help others dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) both in actionable ideas and in giving hope.

The concept of neuroplasticity is key— the brain can be trained. The worst thing you can do is to accept anyone’s claims that you are stuck with your condition. That includes doctors, many of whom are not only poorly informed about concussion (even neurologists!), but are hassled and harried by today’s medical system. My own internist tells me that there are zero (0) concussion gurus in the San Francisco Bay Area, and it is a major population center!

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Rewired with 4/0 Cable and Symmetry: 10 Kilowatt Battery System in Mercedes Sprinter with dual Lithionics 400-amp batteries, dual Xantrex Freedom XC Inverter/Charger

Due to my concussion my writeup with pictures is delayed. A more detailed report to follow as time allows when I recover sufficiently to work at the computer for some time.

My new 1.5-inch-thick hickory butcherblock table is now in place. It turns out to be a very challenging issue to wire dual inverters to dual batteries and dual bus bars and fuses using 4/0 cables in a confined space; my usage constraints made it particularly challenging but other configurations might be easier. A 144-inch wheelbase Sprinter leaves little room to place both batteries along with wiring and outlets, etc, at least for my requirements with a 44 X 29 inch table and need for legroom and storage room underneath. It is not that it cannot be done, it’s that between the very thick cables and my requirement to maximum leg room and other space and where I wanted the outlets, it’s a tricky business to pre-plan all cable routing.

To my knowledge, this is the most capable battery system ever installed by ADF Sprinters (they do about 280 Sprinters a year). Or maybe ever installed in a Sprinter, period. I working both with Lithionics and ADF Sprinters to wire it as good as it can get in terms of proper electrical performance.

  • The dual Xantrex Freedom XC 2000W inverter/chargers are bolted on under the hickory table, so strong and tough that care is required to not break the screws. Sorbothane is used in many places between such hard contct surfaces to allow a little give on very rough roads.
  • The dual Lithionics batteries now each have a 250 amp fuses on the way to the bus bar. Negative and positive 4/0 cables to the bus bar are now identical length, which should deliver symmetric draw from each battery — to be verified soon.

Here is the cabling required:

  • One 4/0 cable from positive terminal of each battery to 250 amp fuse box then to positive/hot bus bar, identical lengths for symmetry. We ended up keeping this cable length to only 5 feet.
  • One 4/0 cable from negative terminal of each battery to bus bar, identical lengths for symmetry.
  • Dual 1/0 cables from alternator to bus bar (for charging).
  • One 1/0 cable from positive bus bar to each inverter, equal length for symmetry (4/0 not needed for ~12 inch run, besides, 4/0 lugs won’t fit into the inverter).
  • One 1/0 cable from negative bus bar to each inverter.
  • Dual 4/0 grounding cables of equal length from chassis to negative/grounding bus bar.

That’s a LOT of cabling! It’s not as elegant as I would have liked, but the space constraints made it tough: the 4/0 welding cable cannot just be bent to fit; one has to plan out where excess cabling length will be looped or routed for example, since the cables between the hot and ground bus bars *must* be identical for symmetric performance. Thus one cable has to be coiled, complicating matters a bit more.

Shown below, 4/0 welding cable.

4/0 welding cable to connect 12V battery system — keeps voltage losses to a minumum while handling 300+ amps
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