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Concussion aka Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI): Experience Report and Advice, Ongoing

The terms “mild” and “traumatic” are a curious combination. I would not say what I have experienced is mild. But what is meant is that most concussions are mild compared to massive loss of function that cripples people in debilitating ways, sometimes permanently. But there is a lot of hope that the brain, being neuroplastic, has powerful ways of healing itself, if appropriate steps are taken.

I have added a new section on concussion: how it happened, initial (lack of) diagnosis, a chronological log of how I felt, how I dealt with it, ideas on nutrition and information, nervous system stimulation, medical massage, exercise, etc.

I have formed my own views based on what works/worked for me and share them. I hope this might help others dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) both in actionable ideas and in giving hope.

Lloyd’s Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI / concussion) Experience and Log

If you have just experienced a concussion, start with a positive attitude! Read Concussion: What to expect, and Setting Expectations and then Concussion: Post-Crash Acute Phase. My March 27 entry emphasizes the importance of both adding and removing sensory perceptions, e.g., excessive noise.

I never engaged in self-pity or anger, and I expected a full recovery, and I think that was important to recovery. Set aside hope, and replace it with positive expectations—the brain is a powerful thing. See April 10 Do NOT hope for the best, expect it!.

mTBI is a very complex subject for which modern medicine has few solid answers, if any, along with decades of entrenched and false “knowledge”. This is beginning to change, fortunately. IMO, the reluctance of the medical profession to accept treatment as valid absent harmful A/B placebo studies I feel does far more harm than good.

The concept of neuroplasticity is key— the brain can be trained. The worst thing you can do is to accept anyone’s claims that you are stuck with your condition. That includes doctors, many of whom are not only poorly informed about concussion (even neurologists!), but are hassled and harried by today’s medical system. My own internist tells me that there are zero (0) concussion gurus in the San Francisco Bay Area, and it is a major population center!

Emerging Reserch Shows that Health and Wellness Starts with Diet and Exercise and Sleep

Garbage in = garbage out. That is, if the inputs are bad (unhealthy food, sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep) then it is virtually a guarantee of poor health.

What’s the point of living a long time if one’s body is not functioning well, so that living becomes incapacity and/or suffering and/or deprived of simply joys?

Emerging research on many fronts addresses brain and nervious system health, cardiovascular health, the immune system, etc. It’s all fascinating stuff. This has been my thesis for some years here on this web site, namely that exercise (cycling for me) and diet are critical. So is sleep, but that can be a tougher nut.

My hope is that Big Pharma and its quest for blockbuster pills does not hurt more people than it has already, by training people to think in terms of pills-are-the-answer—because most of the time, they are not. If all of obese and sedentary America got out and exercised 30 minutes a day and ate a healthy diet, I wonder how many hundreds of billions of dollars would be saved each year. Food and exercise are the best medicine of all.

See also:

Blindness cure?

The *brain* can be a root cause of blindness (not the eyes or not just the eyes). However, sometimes the eyes can be the issue; see Could THIS be a cure for blindness? Revolutionary technique restores the vision of two patients who were unable to read even with glasses.

The title should really be “could this be the cure for one type of blindness”, of course.

- The groundbreaking procedure treats age-related macular degeneration.
- It is the most common cause of blindness - striking 600,000 in the UK
- Both patients were unable to read before the procedure - but could after
- A team of British doctors inserted a patch of stem cells into their retinas

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

The claimed discovery of a new organ and one larger than any other known organ is flabbergasting. I believe that acupuncture works based on a stunning cure for me: a one-treatment cure of a 6 months problem some years ago. This new finding lens support to the basis for acupuncure being real and based on anatomical structures.

Structure and Distribution of an Unrecognized Interstitium in Human Tissues

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

A study published in Scientific Reports on Tuesday suggests that a previously unknown organ has been found in the human body. More astonishingly, the paper puts forth the idea that this new organ is the largest by volume among all 80 organs—if what the researchers found is, in fact, an organ.

How could what’s being termed as the largest organ in our body escape notice for so long? A dogged trio of researchers stumbled upon it—despite the fact that they argue it’s a crucial part of our bodies and been there all along, right in front of us. It’s an astounding find—but not without controversy.

Along with brain hacking, the future looks bright for new approaches to debilitating medical issues.

A study published in Scientific Reports on Tuesday suggests that a previously unknown organ has been found in the human body. More astonishingly, the paper puts forth the idea that this new organ is the largest by volume among all 80 organs—if what the researchers found is, in fact, an organ. How could what’s being termed as the largest organ in our body escape notice for so long? A dogged trio of researchers stumbled upon it—despite the fact that they argue it’s a crucial part of our bodies and been there all along, right in front of us. It’s an astounding find—but not without controversy.

Hacking the Brain and Nervous System

The claimed discovery of a new organ and one larger than any other known organ is flabbergasting. I personally believe that acupuncture works (for me, a one-day cure of a 6 months problem some years ago), and this new finding finally gives credence to why it works.

The Interstitium, the Largest Organ We Never Knew We Had

My interest in brain hacking has grown since my concussion journey, which made clear to me just how sensitive yet “plastic” the brain is. See for example the discussion of tDCS and PoNS in my Concussion Recovery Phase 2 page.

Here’s a fascinating example of “brain hacking” which like tDCS and PoNS uses electricity.

In Electrical Pulses and Neural Code Boost Memory Storage:

By artificially replicating the neural firing involved in correct memory formation, researchers improved memory by 35 percent.

Researchers have figured out how to strengthen the storage of new memories in the human brain using electrical stimulation and neural patterns that were previously used to store other memories.

In case that sentence didn’t get stored properly in your own brain, we’ll say it another way: Scientists now have the power—using electrical impulses—to improve storage of new information in the human brain.

The report, published last week in the Journal of Neural Engineering, is the first to crack the neural codes linked to specific, individual memories in the human hippocampus, says Robert Hampson, a professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, who co-authored the report. The research is one of several approaches that could one day lead to “brain prostheses” to fill in for lost memory.

Add in other technologies like a cold laser for nerve stimulation as well as ultrasound to stimulatiespinal nerves for controlling pain and the vagus nerve for epilepsy and depression, and the future of brain and nervous system hacking looks very promising for reversing debilitating conditions.

Like anything else, technologies can be misused: erasure and alteration issues, memory detruction, etc are all ethical issues that arise.

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Concussion aka Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI): Experience Report and Advice, Ongoing

First of all “mild” and “traumatic” are a curious combination. I would not say what I have experienced is mild. But what is meant is that most concussions are mild compared to massive injury that cripples people in debilitating ways.

I have added a new section on concussion: how it happened, initial (lack of) diagnosis, a chronological log of how I felt, how I dealt with it, ideas on nutrition and information, and so on. It is a very complex subject for which modern medicine has few solid answers, if any.

Accordingly, I hope this might help others dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) both in actionable ideas and in giving hope.

The concept of neuroplasticity is key— the brain can be trained. The worst thing you can do is to accept anyone’s claims that you are stuck with your condition. That includes doctors, many of whom are not only poorly informed about concussion (even neurologists!), but are hassled and harried by today’s medical system. My own internist tells me that there are zero (0) concussion gurus in the San Francisco Bay Area, and it is a major population center!

Rewired with 4/0 Cable and Symmetry: 10 Kilowatt Battery System in Mercedes Sprinter with dual Lithionics 400-amp batteries, dual Xantrex Freedom XC Inverter/Charger

Due to my concussion my writeup with pictures is delayed. A more detailed report to follow as time allows when I recover sufficiently to work at the computer for some time.

My new 1.5-inch-thick hickory butcherblock table is now in place. It turns out to be a very challenging issue to wire dual inverters to dual batteries and dual bus bars and fuses using 4/0 cables in a confined space; my usage constraints made it particularly challenging but other configurations might be easier. A 144-inch wheelbase Sprinter leaves little room to place both batteries along with wiring and outlets, etc, at least for my requirements with a 44 X 29 inch table and need for legroom and storage room underneath. It is not that it cannot be done, it’s that between the very thick cables and my requirement to maximum leg room and other space and where I wanted the outlets, it’s a tricky business to pre-plan all cable routing.

To my knowledge, this is the most capable battery system ever installed by ADF Sprinters (they do about 280 Sprinters a year). Or maybe ever installed in a Sprinter, period. I working both with Lithionics and ADF Sprinters to wire it as good as it can get in terms of proper electrical performance.

  • The dual Xantrex Freedom XC 2000W inverter/chargers are bolted on under the hickory table, so strong and tough that care is required to not break the screws. Sorbothane is used in many places between such hard contct surfaces to allow a little give on very rough roads.
  • The dual Lithionics batteries now each have a 250 amp fuses on the way to the bus bar. Negative and positive 4/0 cables to the bus bar are now identical length, which should deliver symmetric draw from each battery — to be verified soon.

Here is the cabling required:

  • One 4/0 cable from positive terminal of each battery to 250 amp fuse box then to positive/hot bus bar, identical lengths for symmetry. We ended up keeping this cable length to only 5 feet.
  • One 4/0 cable from negative terminal of each battery to bus bar, identical lengths for symmetry.
  • Dual 1/0 cables from alternator to bus bar (for charging).
  • One 1/0 cable from positive bus bar to each inverter, equal length for symmetry (4/0 not needed for ~12 inch run, besides, 4/0 lugs won’t fit into the inverter).
  • One 1/0 cable from negative bus bar to each inverter.
  • Dual 4/0 grounding cables of equal length from chassis to negative/grounding bus bar.

That’s a LOT of cabling! It’s not as elegant as I would have liked, but the space constraints made it tough: the 4/0 welding cable cannot just be bent to fit; one has to plan out where excess cabling length will be looped or routed for example, since the cables between the hot and ground bus bars *must* be identical for symmetric performance. Thus one cable has to be coiled, complicating matters a bit more.

Shown below, 4/0 welding cable.

4/0 welding cable to connect 12V battery system — keeps voltage losses to a minumum while handling 300+ amps

Mercedes Sprinter: Ordered the 180 Liter / 47.5 Gallon Fuel Tank for the 144-Inch Sprinter

I’ve paid as of today, waiting for shipment info on Feb 7.

Mercedes of Reno did the install. Ask for Kwanny (service manager) if you also want an install. Please let him know that you heard about it at Lloyd Chambers' WindInMyFace.com.

My writeup now includes installation glitches, and pictures and a rough cost summary.

Mercedes Sprinter: Installing a Higher Capacity Fuel Tank (ACGB Tanks)

ACGB 180 liter Fuel Tank for Mercedes Sprinter: as installed on 4x4 144-inch wheelbase, underbody view
ACGB High-Capacity Fuel Tank for Mercedes Sprinter
MacPerformanceGuide.com

Sprinter Van: Bed and Breakfast (and lunch and dinner) and Just Pull Out the Bike and Go and Sleeping in Comfort Just Like Home

It rock, and rocks over rocks too.

I’m loving my Sprinter van, which I’ve had for 6 months now. I can change for cycling, pump the tires, then go for a nice ride.

In the morning when it’s cold, I turn on both Xantrex Freedom XC 2000W inverters and pop on two 1500W space heaters powered by my 10 kilowatt battery system and wow is that a nice luxury. The electric power is for work (computing/photography), but the vast bulk of the power goes for electric heat, something I had not anticipated, but now greatly enjoy.

Many other amenities accrue, such as a nice Pinot Grigio from one of the two Yeti Tundra 210 coolers that form the bed platform.

f8 @ 1/20 sec, ISO 50; 2018-03-15 06:22:51
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander NOKTON 40mm F1.2 Aspherical

[low-res image for bot]

 

Rigorously lab tested and OWC certified.

Hamstring Tendon Injury: How to Treat When a Season of 8 More Double Centuries Looms?

At about mile 120 of the Joshua Tree Double Century, I began to have shooting pains up my left hamstring. While this slowed my pace, I was able to compensate by use the gluteus muscles more and giving up some power in the left leg.

At first I thought it was a small muscle tear, but it turns out to be something with the sheath around the tendon itself, which feels sandy or crunchy. I rode two days after J0shua Tree for 20 miles, and it re-irritated it. So I am not riding at all this week, hoping it heals up enough to do well at the Solvang Spring Double Century on March 17.

I have no idea how to treat this (any specialist doctors out there?), but I had a few prednisone tablets from treating persistent airway impairment from a virus and then allergies, and these seemed to help. Not taking much—don’t want to—but it seems to have taken out a lot of fluid from the area, which was swollen with fluid of a baseball size or so. Apparently prednisone has the same fluid-reducing properties there as for lungs.

Update 15 March: I have not ridden for 3 days, which will give me 4 days for the hamstring tendon to get well. The key factor was 10 mg prednison before bed, which took a great deal of fluid out of the affected area and no pain as of yesterday. Still a slight thickening in affected area, but minimal. I now have two more days and nights for it to recover until Solvang Spring Double Century. I expect it to act up late in the day there, which will rob me of some power as it did in Joshua Tree, but then I have two weeks to baby it and treat it until the Southern Inyo Double Century.

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Counting Up My Double Centuries

I am starting to lose track of how many double centuries I’ve done (well, I have all the training recordings but I keep forgetting exactly.

2011: 1 Everest Challenge (205 miles in 2 days)
2012: 5 = Death Valley Double, Solvang Spring Double, Devil Mountain Double, Alta Alpina, Everest Challenge
2013: 1 = Everest Challenge
2014: 1 = Solvang Spring Double, Everest Challenge (aborted 2nd day, lungs)
2015: 7 = Southern Inyo Double, Joshua Tree Double, Solvang Spring Double, Devil Mountain Double, Central Coast Double, Marin Double, Alta Alpina
2016: 8 = Southern Inyo Double, Joshua Tree Double, Solvang Spring Double, Devil Mountain Double, Central Coast Double, Davis Double, Eastern Sierra Double, Alta Alpina (to mile 165 7 of 8 passes, severe cramping)
2017: 8 = Camino Real Double, Southern Inyo Double, Solvang Spring Double, Devil Mountain Double, Central Coast Double, Davis Double, Eastern Sierra Double
2018: = 2 done, 8 more planned

I’m being slightly liberal here, counting the 2-day Everest Challenge as a double century and also Alta Alpine where I had issues and completed only 7 of 8 passes last year (severe cramps).

Total as of March 2018: 33, or 29 if strictly counted as single-day 192+ mile events.

Expected tally for 2018: 41

Double centuries planned for 2018

Barring injury that is.

I have an ambitious year planned for at least 12 double centuries.

Everything revolves around finishing well in the California Triple Challenge, the 3 doubles highlighted in green, which starts with amping-up fitness early and shedding fat ASAP.

See also my letter to Chuck Bramwell on solo vs de facto teams that game the placement system.

Continues below...

Double Century schedule for 2018

Getting it done

The cycling double century schedule shown below should be a lot easier with the comfort of the Mercedes Sprinter adventure van, not to mention being able to work efficiently before and after with no rush to get home.

My goal this year is to place well in the 2018 California Triple Crown which this year consists of:

These are perhaps 3 of the top 4 hardest double centuries in the state in my view, having done all the hard ones. I rate Alta Alpina 8 Pass Challenge as the hardest due to high elevation and sometimes very high temperatures.

By “placing well” I refer mostly to personal best efforts with no glitches; something close to what I can do on my very best days. I don’t hope to win, only to finish well for my own ability. I do hope to win at least one of the other double centuries this year (I’ve one the Central Coast Double once, and the Eastern Sierra Double once, so that is not unrealistic if training goes well).

This year, the series has all three events within 90 minutes driving of my home, so I have no excuse for not doing it (in past years it was too far to travel).

Why so many doubles so early?

The trick is getting in shape early, which means dropping 15 pounds of body fat by April 29, or just under one pound of body fat per week.

That’s incredibly hard to do, as it means a 500 calorie per day deficit (a pound of body fat is 3500 calories since it includes some water). Since back in 2011 I lost weight at the rate of 1.25 pound per week for 12 weeks. the goal has an existence proof, though 7 years later it will be harder to do. In 2011 (Sept 13) I got down to 7.9% body fat (168 pounds).

As of Jan 1 2018, I have reversed those last two digits: 168 now up to 186 = about 17% body fat.

  • Each double century typically loses me a full pound of body fat. It varies; it can be 3/4 to 1.5 pounds of body fat, depending on difficulty and self discipline in recovery eating properly.
  • There are two back-to-back (1 week apart) pairs of doubles 3/10 and 3/17 plus 4/7 and f/14. This early physical stress sets things up nicely for stronger results later in the year. Then a 2 week recovery prior to DMD on 4/29.

Why body weight is a BFD

The reason I need to drop 15 pound of fat is that Devil Mountain Double even 5 pounds of extra body fat costs half an hour of riding time: if total riding weight (TRW) is 196 pounds (rider 171 , clothes/shoes 3, food and water 5, bike 17) then 15 more pounds is a 7.6% increase in TRW. Devil Mountain Double with its 20000' of climbing means that ascending is about 60% of the riding time. Since it takes about 15 hours, that’s 9 hours. Adding 7% or so to the time, that adds 38 minutes to the riding time—around 14:20 versus 15:00. But it’s worse than that: if it’s hot, more fat means more stress (heat). Higher weight forces lower cadence on climbs, stressing legs and burning them out prematurely plus demanding higher energy expenditure, which means burning off glucose stores faster (higher exertion level for same pace). So I deem the difference more like an hour. And that means daylight finish versus night finish, which saves another 10 minutes (much easier to see/navigate). So that 15 extra pounds really means 70 minutes more riding time.

Losing body fat

Fat comes off most easily at first as the body is less cranky about losing fat. For me that means I should be able to get down to 179 on or ahead of that schedule (I’ve done that before), but 179 to 175 gets harder, and 175 to 171 the body fights back, big time (appetite, more efficient metabolism).

Portable, rugged, and bus-powered

2018 Double Century #2: Joshua Tree Double Century in Twenty Nine Palms, CA

The park service was up to its usual dirty tricks, threatening the use of force (police) to block any cyclist from going through the park, including those who had annual passes like myself. This is the state of America—unlawful use of force by bureaucrats with dubious legal basis: there is zero impact and absolutely no support within the park—yet actual threats of being turned away (or worse). So most everyone did the big circle loop route around the park.

2018-03-10: Lloyd after finishing 2018 Joshua Tree Double Century

I had an extraordinary day at the Joshua Tree Double Century on March 10m 2018 with only three minor setbacks:

  • Soaked feet /wet socks the rest of the day start around mile 100. It wasn’t the rain so much as my front tire kicking up water onto my shoes, which became squishy with water. The compensation: cool temperatures are ideal for me, since I put out relatively high wattage, so cool temps help shed body heat.
  • Rest stops 4/5/6/7/8 were not there. Even though I was the last one to leave (excepting a 3 man pacelining team), from what I can tell I outrode everyone excepting that 3-man pacelining team. Only by the kindness of a stranger (and at just the right time) did I get water at mile 144 right at the summit of 29 Palms / Hwy 62 and rice Rd. Otherwise, dehydration would have gotten very bad.
  • The worst issue: what feels like a small tear in the left hamstring about 3 inches above the left knee*, to the inside. This had been bugging me for about a week, but starting at mile 120 or so, I began to get shooting pains from that area all the way up my leg. This slowed my down significantly, but I was able to compensate by forcing the gluteus muscles to do more work, which made it only mildly painful.

* Turns out that pain in my left hamstring seems to be more serious than I thought. The large tendon that runs through the big hamstring muscle has a gritty feel to it, as if the sheathing that surrounds it were filled with fine sand. This has me worried—setting aside the Solvang Spring Double one week after the Joshua Tree Double Century, there is the matter the subsequent 6 doubles in 2018. With my strength and endurance waxing to high levels, the idea of having to quit cycling for a week or two weeks or a month to allow this thing to heal is extremely disappointing—basically the end of my season in competitive terms. So I hope it can heal quickly. Walking is no good; motions that lift the leg are worst of all.

It is Monday as I write this, which means only 4 more days for it to feel better before Solvang. So I guess I’ll fatten up and not ride or ride very little and see what happens. If it is not all but gone for Solvang, I’ll have to skip Solvang to allow time for it to heal for the next double on April 7 (nearly 4 weeks). I have no idea how to treat it and no one to ask 400 miles from home. The area is swollen some, from fluid it seems, and so maybe some anti-inflammatory agent might help. But I just don’t know. Today's ride (Monday) felt OK with the left leg; minor pain but nothing problematic. But when done with a very easy 20-mile ride, it seemed to be worse. Well, that was the test—whether I could use it and improve it, or use it and worsen it. Seems to be the latter.

I had no bronchospasms, but I also wore a face mask along the entire Interstate 10 section. At the finish, I noticed that cyclists had absolutely filthy faces—which means they were breathing that nasty stuff in. I will be using an N100 face mask a lot more, definitely any time there is significant dust or heavy traffic (which throws up dust and whatever toxic metals are on the roadway).

Regarding that 3-many pacelining team (beat me by ~29 minutes)—when they caught up to me at mile 100, they passed me, then I passed them, then they started drafting me. I had to wave them off but they did not understand, so I just stopped pedaling and let them go. So I was beaten in an unfair contest by a 3-man team in which each rider gets to rest for 2/3 of the way at greatly reduced effort—massively lower physical stress and effort needed when pacelining. Chuck Bramwell just won’t discuss this “external assist” versus solo effort ridiculousness; see my essay and his responses in How is Drafting in a Paceline Different from an Electric Motor?.

Fueling

I consumed a total of 500 calories of Hammer HEED, and roughly 700 calories of GU and 120 calories of Osmo, equating to about 20% of the total caloric expenditure, a little low but nearly optimal (20 to 25% is best). The relatively cool temperatures kept dehydration far lower than in hotter years; I drank only 4.5 liters of water. However, that’s because I carbo loaded the two prior days, which stores a great deal of water.

Post ride

Rare in my experience in 36 double centuries, I felt ready to ride more when done. I went out and ate immediately and wanted to eat and it tasted good. Most doubles I feel like I don’t want to eat until tomorrow or feel more like vomiting than anything else. Not so this one, suggesting that my fitness has gone way up, and that I nailed the fueling and hydration.

Results

start: 05:30:37
finish: 15:25:42
elapsed: 09:53:40
riding time: 9:47:11 (time actually on bike)

2018 Joshua Tree Double Century results

Riders {Mark Christopherson, Ludovic Hilde, Patrick Copp} were the 3 man team that “won” with identical times of 09:26. Their times are identical—pacelining for 196 miles is vastly easier than soloing. They should be listed as a team win; it is not a fair contest, and it is grossly misleading in terms of who “won”. It was clear when they passed me and I passed them and then they drafted me, that they were no stronger than me—but each guy gets to rest about 2/3 of the time. That’s no personal win, it’s a team win. While I respect their right and choice to paceline a double, I reject it as any kind of win except a team win.

I think team efforts should be noted as such in the results for all double centuries. But more important (to me), a SOLO designation (honor system) should be noted, which means taking no draft for the entire distance, thus ruling out pacelining or any kind of drafting. To be clear, some haphazard “by luck” drafting is at least a more sporting and honest effort than a pre-planned coordinated team effort. Why not just install an electric motor and call it a win—there is no difference; both are an external assist.

Red line is heart rate (bpm), green line is power (watts).

2018-03-10: graph showing power in watts, heart rate, elevation for 2018 Joshua Tree Double Century
2018-03-10: Lloyd after finishing 2018 Joshua Tree Double Century
f1.8 @ 1/500 sec, ISO 20; 2018-03-10 15:32:24
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus back dual camera 3.99mm f/1.8 @ 28mm (4mm)

[low-res image for bot]
MacPerformanceGuide.com

Loss of Muscle Mass in Older Age Correlates Strongly with Loss of Nerves

Thanks to Robert VB for sending this article along.

This one below resonated with me, because in January 2018, 3 years after suffering significant nerve damage, I finally felt like my legs wire “firing” again—and I’ve put on muscle mass at the same time and can spin smoothly up to 110 rpm as I could back prior to the nerve damages. And I am much stronger than the last 3 years.

Inevitable muscle wasting of old age could be stopped, scientists believe

The inevitable muscle wasting of old age could be stopped, scientists believe, after discovering why people become frail as they grow older.

Most people become weaker in their later years, as their leg muscles get smaller and less able to bear weight, which often leads to disability and falls. But until now, nobody has known why the process happens or if it can be reversed. However, scientists at Manchester Metropolitan University have discovered that by the age of 75, people have between 30 and 50 per cent fewer nerves controlling the muscles in their legs.

...

The scientists also found that the nerves in healthy muscles can send out new branches to rescue muscles which have become detached, and believe that regular exercise could help this branching process.

...

“Our findings debunk the assumption that ageing automatically makes us more frail.”

Sounds like the “I’m getting old” excuse should translate as “I’m lazy”.

Benefit of Cycling as Aging Progresses: Stronger Immune System, Muscle Tissue 30 Years Young

Robert V sent along this interesting article, which dovetail with my sense if it all, which I’ve mentioned for years now—I hardly ever get sick, and when I do I recover very rapidly.

Cycling keeps your immune system young, study finds

Cycling can hold back the effects of ageing and rejuvenate the immune system, a study has found.

Scientists carried out tests on 125 amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 and compared them with healthy adults from a wide age group who did not exercise regularly. The 'miracle pill': how cycling could save the NHS.

The findings, outlined in two papers in the journal Aging Cell, showed that the cyclists preserved muscle mass and strength with age while maintaining stable levels of body fat and cholesterol. In men, testosterone levels remained high.

More surprisingly, the anti-ageing effects of cycling appeared to extend to the immune system.

...

“However, importantly, our findings debunk the assumption that ageing automatically makes us more frail. Our research means we now have strong evidence that encouraging people to commit to regular exercise throughout their lives is a viable solution to the problem that we are living longer but not healthier.”

...

What’s the point of living a long time if one’s body is not functioning well, so that living becomes incapacity and/or suffering and/or deprived of simply joys?

See also:

Poor Customer Service Not Good for Any Business — Double Centuries Included

I cannot see well at close range, particularly at dusk/night. So I like to print the cue sheets (turn by turn instructions) prior to every double century. Problem is, paper ones disintegrate within an hour or two from perspiration, and plastic makes it even harder to see, particularly at the times I most need to see it (dusk/dark and even reflections in sun).

So my approach is to print the cue sheets on map paper, which is waterproof and does not smear or tear, plus I enlarge the type so I can see it more easily; typically I use both sides for a nice enlarged view, half the rout on each side.

The following exchange shows how people reduce their chances of succeeding in any venture by failing to understand (or even try to understand) customer needs, and to at least try to apply Miller’s Law: “to understand what someone is saying, you must try to understand what it might be true of”. In other words, look at things from the other person’s perspective, put yourself in the other person’s shoes, etc.

I won’t name names here as this is intended as constructive criticism. I am hoping the person involved will take the time to understand what went wrong.

Lloyd: can I get the Cue sheet in Excel format? I like to print it larger, and the PDF doesn't let me do that. Leaving shortly, no way to print the next 10 days Do you have the cue sheet in Excel format?

Response: 10 days out we cannot guarantee changes may be needed. Still waiting on final permissions.

Lloyd: thx. I like to print on map paper, which sweat won’t dissolve to pulp… paper you supply disintegrates, and plastic over it hard to read.

Response: Have you ever noticed you find something to complain about in response to nearly every email?

Lloyd: Do you really have time to show me such gross disrespect? You owe me an apology. If you had wisdom, you’d see it as a chance to improve your game. I’m doing you a favor if you’d pause and think about it. I rely on a MAP. Paper disintegrates. I can’t see at close range and plastic makes it much harder.

The conversation started out factually, stating my needs, but ended up being an ad hominem attack. Worse, it shuts down solutions—a route that might change a little is not a big deal (a pen can deal with that), but when someone starts down a dead end into personal attack mode, the solution of sending the cue sheet as is vaporizes as something reasonable that both parties can accept.

I’m used to dealing with this particular outfit—they have rejected every one of my suggestions over 5 years and disrespected me several times for good measured (threatened to cancel my registation once also!). Sadly, I don’t think they have ever paused to consider any of any suggestions in all those years. They are stuck in a mental rut. I hope they can see the light someday, which is all I wish for.

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