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COVID-19: Public Policy Uses the Infection Rate, but ignores the Key Metric —  do Experts have Functioning Brains in Terms of Minimizing Damage?

See SARS CoV2 aka COVID-19: Time to Steepen the Curve and Accelerate Infection of Low-Risk People.

With more testing and more people mingling and getting infected, the news media is all agog about the rising number of infections. Which is a highly misleading thing unless referenced against the testing rate—which uses unreliable tests and self-selection sampling. The data remains GIGO and does not pass muster as defensible science.

Still, it seems clear that there are a lot more infections. And that is a Good Thing: unless we want to drag out the misery for years and put high-risk people at continuous risk for a long time, the right thing to do is to infect as many low-risk people as fast as possible, while protecting high-risk people and ensuring that treatment capacity remains well within sustainable limits. Try finding that thought process in the mainstream news media or from any experts.

Given that COVID-19 is not going away and must run its course, the only metric that matters is whether medical facilities can handle the influx of those needing COVID-19 care. How many people are infected is a counterproductive proxy for the core issue of reaching herd immunity while minimizing damage.

It is unethical to in effect kill people by delay in medical treatment for numerous other medical reasons (cancer, heart disease, diabetes, deaths resulting from economic stress, etc) But that is exactly what public policy continues to do. The failure of our experts to take on the responsibility of fixing the broken narrative has several explanations, none of which should give anyone confidence in 'experts'.

In the end, deaths from COVID-19 might pale in comparison from needless deaths from other causes because no experts are calling for a proper risk management approach. And many of the CV19 deaths are in high-risk people with short expected lifespans who might have died within a few years in any case. I have two parents about 80 years old and I don’t want to lose them to COVID-19, but as public policy goes we should be talking about loss of lifespan of the population, not about absolute numbers of deaths.

Meanwhile, allopathic medical doctors fail to make any connection between baseline health and nutrition and nutrient deficiency, particularly Vitamin D, Vitamin C, magnesium. And thus those who should be preventing severe cases of COVID-19 sit around doing nothing to increase the baseline health of the population, let alone look into relatively cheap treatments like intravenous Vitamin C, proven to kill even nasty viruses like poliomyelitis.

Is it too cynical to suggest that attention to last-gasp $3000 drug treatments for severely-ill COVID-19 patients are displacing inexpensive nutritional support that could be applied to an entire population to save tens of thousands of lives, if not more? This is the same broken record of statins versus magnesium deficiency—the morally and financially corrupt medical establishment avoiding prevention like the plague in favor of dubious treatments for life-threatening conditions—see for example Subclinical magnesium deficiency: a principal driver of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis. It’s not much different than buying a new car and never changing the oil, then continuously fixing all the broken parts.


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Science Daily: “Declining Eyesight Improved by Looking at Deep Red Light” — Retinal Mitochondrial Health

Among other improvements from magnesium supplementation and especially lung function, recent magnesium supplementation gives me the distinct impression that my dim-light eyesight has improved, though I have no hard data to back up that claim.

Some caution is advised, as this is a very small study (cohort of 12 male and 12 female subjects).

Science Daily: Declining Eyesight Improved by Looking at Deep Red Light

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans.

Scientists believe the discovery, published in the Journals of Gerontology, could signal the dawn of new affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision.

...

In humans around 40 years-old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline.

Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role.

Researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light.

"Mitochondria have specific light absorbance characteristics influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 1000nm are absorbed and improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production," said Professor Jeffery.

... Professor Jeffery said: "Our study shows that it is possible to significantly improve vision that has declined in aged individuals using simple brief exposures to light wavelengths that recharge the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery.

"The technology is simple and very safe, using a deep red light of a specific wavelength, that is absorbed by mitochondria in the retina that supply energy for cellular function.

WIND: will this finding be noted among allopathic medical doctors given that it is prevention and not a treatment requiring an expensive drug treatment? It it holds up to scrutiny, could this effect improve other aspects of eye health?

Wavelength of 670nm is very deep red, close to the faux-infrared cutoff wavelength I have long favored for infrared photography of around 720nm. At least half the energy of sunlight is very deep red and infrared, a fact that a camera modified for IR will tell you just based on exposure time. So I wonder what simply going outdoors in bright sun achieves?

Protecting eyes from both UV and IR with sunglasses always seemed like the smart move, but now it seems that some infrared exposure might be a good thing: does getting out into the sun without sunglasses for a short period where there is a lot of reflected light (say a beach or snow) perhaps yield a dose of infrared that is beneficial for your eyes?

See also Death Valley Eureka Dunes in Infrared.

Eureaka Dunes in infrared
Eureaka Dunes in infrared
f9 @ 1/200 sec, ISO 200; 2007-02-24 13:35:54
Canon EOS 5D + Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS @ 24mm

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Summitting White Mountain Peak on Mountain Bike — Minimal Snow

The magnesium supplementation I’ve been doing has my lungs working as good as they have in a decade.

Which helped a lot with my 12-pounds-too-heavy body and out-of-shape legs as I worked higher and higher towards the 14252' summit of White Mountain Peak.

The road to the summit is largely free of snow requiring only short hike-a-bike diversions. Within a week the entire route should be ridable. My Moots Mooto X YBB performed flawlessly as usual—eight years and going strong.

View past Marmot Meadow to White Mountain Peak
f1.8 @ 1/2500 sec, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 14:36:00
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 12825 ft / 3909 m

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High point before descending to saddle prior to final summit pitch
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Snow cups at 13600', view to summit hut
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iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 13626 ft / 4153 m

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Lingering snow not far below summit hut
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iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 14067 ft / 4288 m

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f1.8 @ 1/4600 sec, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 16:10:00
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m

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View southeast from White Mountain Peak
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iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m

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View south from White Mountain Peak
f1.8 @ 1/2300 sec panorama, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 16:42:00
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m

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View southeast to southwest from White Mountain Peak
f2.8 @ 1/1050 sec, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 16:42:00
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8 ENV: altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m

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Selfie with Moots MootoX YBB on White Mountain Peak
f1.8 @ 1/2700 sec, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 16:34:00
iPhone 7 Plus + iPhone 7 Plus 4.0mm f/1.8
ENV: White Mountain Peak, altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m, 50°F / 10°C

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Panorama to south from White Mountain Peak
f1.8 @ 1/4400 sec panorama 9 frames cylindrical, ISO 20; 2020-06-19 16:36:09
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ENV: White Mountain Peak, altitude 14252 ft / 4344 m, 50°F / 10°C

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Tired and done
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ENV: White Mountain Road, altitude 11876 ft / 3620 m, 50°F / 10°C

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Don’t Treat Asthma, CURE It! Magnesium Supplementation has Banished My Small Airway Pulmonary Issues; ZERO need for prescription inhaler for 3 weeks running

See also: Magnesium Personal Findings: Brain, Lungs and Asthma, Sleep, Urinary Flow, Muscle Spasms

Update July 2020: back at sea level for a week (where effects of altitude acclimatization are mostly gone), it feels like I hardly have to breathe even riding at a steady 210 watts (my bicycling power meter makes effort level rigorously objective). My heart rate is very low relative the power output. Clearly I am getting notably more efficient oxygen intake—the physiological evidence is compelling—I have tracked my performance for decades including recording power and heart rate for a decade, and what I am seeing is remarkable.

The ReMag magnesium I’ve been taking has my small airways working as good as they have in a decade. That and my total lack of need for any prescription inhaler is unprecedented in 30 years. And it’s especially remarkable given dust and pollen in recent weeks.

Yesterday, I rode to the summit of White Mountain Peak (14252' elevation) and my lung function was strikingly good. My muscle strength and anaerobic threshold not so much, but those are training issues—none done this year in those areas. However, the spectacular lung function significantly overcame the anaerobic threshold limitations.

Also I was able to breath through my nose (mouth closed) up to about 12800' on moderate grades and even right up to the summit so long as the grade was slight. That too is unprecedented; it means that my lungs are operating at high efficiency. And I have narrow nasal passages / sinuses that have not provided good airflow for years.

Finally, I also found that with only 36 hours acclimatization that I could hold my breath for 100 seconds at 11600' elevation, another indicator of outstanding lung function.

Finally finally: I am no longer sleeping and waking up with a woolly dry tongue; I am able to sleep and breathe through my nose instead of lapsing into open-mouth breathing, a known damager of overall health.

 

Curing instead of treating your asthma

I’m not saying that sensitive lungs will never be sensitive or that lungs won’t react to heavy pollen loads and such. But between getting magnesium levels up to snuff and perhaps using CBD as well, it might be that the need for prescription inhaler treatment will largely vaporize.

If you’re asthmatic and are assuming you must remain on a prescription inhaler forever, think again. Your condition will surely be improved if not cured by appropriate magnesium supplementation. Moreover, many prescription inhalers like albuterol have serious and dangerous rebound effects as well as losing effectiveness quickly. Dangerous stuff if you can avoid it.

Relying on expensive and risky prescription drugs foisted on patients by most allopathic medical doctors (near-zero training or knowledge of nutrition!), think this situation over and work with your doctor on moving away from prescription inhaler. Be warned however that 99% of MDs are grossly ignorant of nutrition and of magnesium and many if not most will be highly resistant to the idea and might scoff or even dismiss your inquiring mind out their own insecurity and ignorance (and/or harried schedule). And don’t get suckered into the highly unreliable serum magnesium test—see Testing for Magnesium Deficiency.

A chance meeting of an RN who works with dangerous asthmatic conditions

On the way up to the summit of White Mountain Peak, I ran into a fellow adventurer and we chatted for 10 minutes or so. I remarked on how well my lungs were working since I started magnesium supplementation. He (Chris) turned out to be an RN who tells me that they routinely use intravenous magnesium sulfate to treat severe asthma and can watch the lungs open up and relax in short order. It is highly effective and a go-to treatment.

What does that tell you about MDs who keep giving you prescription inhalers while never even discussing treating or curing asthma by fixing a nutritional deficiency? You have nothing to lose by fixing magnesium deficiency and a great deal to gain. If your MD won’t 'deal', seek out another.


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Testing for Magnesium Deficiency: the Magnesium RBC Test

Testing for magnesium deficiency is perhaps a waste of money since it is just smarter and easier to go directly to magnesium supplementation, given that the modern diet is highly deficient in magnesium, and the body quickly excretes any excess.zz

However, a test might be of interest and of some value in justifying magnesium supplementation to a wary physician who knows nothing about it.

If a magnesium test turns up a deficiency, other nutrient deficiency issues might be present as well, so think in terms of total nutrition since fixing one deficiency may leave others unaddressed. Optimal health requires full nutrition; no single nutrient can do that—see Health and Vitality Start with getting Key Nutrients.

Things you should know about testing for magnesium deficiency

You get get a magnesium RBC test at RequestATest.com.

  • The best available test is the magnesium RBC test. It is not as good as the ionized magnesium test, but it correlates strongly and the ionized magnesium is generally only available in research labs.
  • The serum magnesium test is highly misleading and unreliable. It an show high serum levels even with extreme tissue deficiency. You should either politely educate this doctor or find a different doctor, because s/he is working out of gross ignorance.

Things you should know about medical doctors and the medical establishment

  • Very few doctors have significant training in nutrition. Medical schools just don’t bother.
  • Few doctors are even aware of magnesium deficiency. Or the massive public health crisis that magnesium deficiency causes just in the realm of cardiovascular health, and that is the tip of the iceberg.
  • Sadly, in my own experience, many doctors have stopped learning and have little interest in prevention and cure and have an attitude of nothing to learn from their patients.
  • Most doctors take what they learned in some fixed medical textbook as more inviolate than the Bible. If it isn’t in there it doesn’t exist. If it is in there, it is The Gospel. This situation is a disaster for patients, particularly with older doctors who have not made the effort to continue training throughout their lives.

See also:

WSJ: U.S. Blood Reserves Are Critically Low

See all COVID-19 posts and all Vitamin C posts.

WSJ: U.S. Blood Reserves Are Critically Low.

Majority of nation’s blood banks have one-day supply or less of Type O blood, officials say.

The U.S. blood supply is at critically low levels after Covid-19 shutdowns have emptied community centers, universities, places of worship and other venues where blood drives typically occur.

The American Red Cross, which supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood, said more than 30,000 planned blood drives have been canceled since mid-March.

Even as some businesses, schools and community groups make plans to reopen in coming months, they have told the Red Cross they don’t anticipate sponsoring blood drives in the near future.

...The majority of the nation’s blood banks now have a one-day supply or less of Type O blood, according to blood bank officials. Typically, blood banks try to maintain a three-to-four-day supply. Type O blood is in the most demand because it can be given to people in any blood group.

...Blood banks, hospitals and other collectors are looking for ways to motivate people to come donate. The Red Cross is offering a $5 Amazon.com gift card via email to people who come in to donate through June 30. Last month, the organization offered a Red Cross T-shirt by mail to donors.

...Brian Gannon, chief executive of Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center in Houston, which serves around 175 hospitals and health-care institutions, said starting June 14 his center would test blood donations for antibodies to the Covid-19 infection, a motivational offer that other blood centers also have been making.

...

Give blood if you can. Many people cannot donate because of certain conditions or past infections, so the pool of donors is smaller than one might think.

I am an O+ blood type (widely compatible*) and I am considering giving blood, but doing so seems incompatible with high altitude hikes and thus my work, so I have not yet decided whether to proceed. I need to look at how much blood is taken and the recovery time and how it might impact my ability to work—I am in no position to give up any income whatsoever.

Getting paid for donating blood is not a consideration for me in this matter... but why are people not paid a market price for their blood? Outrageous hospital fees profit the medical industry handsomely—but that you cannot get paid good money for your own blood strikes me as a grotesque inversion of morality.

O-positive vs O-negative blood

The closest blood type to universal donor is O-negative blood, given to high risk patients such as preemies and children in need eg “pedipac”. Blood must test negative for CMV in particular for children, in addition to being free of a variety of other diseases.

For emergency transfusions, blood group type O negative blood is the variety of blood that has the lowest risk of causing serious reactions for most people who receive it. Because of this, it's sometimes called the universal blood donor type.

lood group types are based on proteins called antigens that are present on red blood cells. There are major antigens and minor antigens coating the red blood cells. Based on the major antigens, blood groups may be classified as one of these four types:
- Type A

- Type B
- Type AB
- Type O

Blood is also classified by rhesus (Rh) factor. If your blood has the Rh factor, you're Rh positive. If your blood lacks the Rh factor, you're Rh negative.

Ideally, blood transfusions are done with donated blood that's an exact match for type and Rh factor. Even then, small samples of the recipient's and donor's blood are mixed to check compatibility in a process known as crossmatching.

In an emergency, type O negative red blood cells may be given to anyone — especially if the situation is life-threatening or the matching blood type is in short supply.

Peter O writes:

I've given gallons of blood over the years, starting in high school (I'm now in my 40's). If you give in the traditional fashion (i.e., whole blood), they take 1 pint. I've always enjoyed the process, and personally have experienced a feeling similar to a runner's high for a few days after giving (although not always). Sometimes you get a green phlebotomist who has trouble finding the vein, but that's been rare. Never any major negative effects, but I'm not an endurance athlete, nor do I live at a high altitude. However I do run, bike, & hike, and like to think I'm in tune with my body. It seems to take a week to feel 100% back up to speed. They say you should wait ~56 days between donations, so I can only presume it takes roughly that long on average to fully restore your supply, but my guess is that varies based on health and nutrition.

I always give through the Red Cross. They do offer the alternative of giving platelets or plasma instead of whole blood. In each case, your blood is separated in a machine and red blood cells and plasma (or platelets) returned to you, which speeds up recovery time and limits stress on your body. I've never done this, but many people do. It takes a bit longer (~1.25 hrs) due to the separation process. Might be a better option if you are concerned about recovery time.

The toughest part is finding a place to donate and scheduling. They don't make it easy. I typically give at blood drives hosted by employers, but that is non-existent now with COVID/working from home. I think that's probably the biggest hit to blood supplies -- the lack of easy access to donate. Red Cross should really get the Bloodmobiles out into some of these suburban locations where folks are working from home and have time to give, if it's made more convenient.

WIND: I imagine that ordinary exercise is not much affected, But try working out at up to 95% of max heart rate even at sea level, and a loss of oxygen (blood carrying capacity) is a big deal, not to mention at 11800' where I am now. If it takes a week to feel normal with casual exercise, then serious training surely is much longer.

If you want less of anything, tax it, or charge for it, or add friction.

The blood donation situation hits 2 of those three points: you as a donor not only get no compensation but in effect have to shell out money to donate. The friction of time spent and thus income lost (for me at least) means very high friction. And that’s not even counting the physical impact.

I agree that access is too hard—for me it would scarf up nearly half a day by the time I drive/park/donate/wait/drive home. That’s a HUGE hit to me as a self-employed person. Why the hell should I donate half a day of my time (time = money) which in effect is writing a check for the privilege of donating blood? Why don’t I get a free health care visit with a doctor, as these institutions ream me with a huge bill for a basic 10-minute medical checkup e.g. $400 for a dermatology exam? This is a grossly unethical state of affairs in which the medical establishment profits at the expense of donors. The only thing that makes me consider donating blood is that there is a person out there who well benefit. The in-between stuff is disgusting.

Rainer U writes:

Concerning blood donations: I am a blood donator with the German Red Cross since many years and it never affected my cycling sports. They always take 500ml (= half a litre) and usually urge me not to enter races or embark onto very long tours for the next three days. This is it. Usually they tour the inner cities and market places with specially equipped trucks, which can process five donators simultaneously. So people can donate on-the-fly while they are in the city for shopping.

You are right that one could expect some kind of compensation for a donation. Sometimes they indeed hand out little presents (umbrellas, power banks and the like), but not on a regular basis.

For me it is, among other things, a contribution to the society. What I get in return is a safe life in a society which works quite well and helps me in times of trouble.

WIND: I’ll end up donating at some point, not for “society” but for that face or two I know I’ll have helped. But maybe that is saying the same thing a different way.

I think Europeans don’t quite understand how expensive and f*ed up our health care system is, so compensation for blood donation in the context of financial ruin for some of us takes on a whole new perspective. My financial life was destroyed by ObamaCare so it’s “personal” for me.


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Physicians Weekly: “High-Dose IV Vitamin C on ARDS by COVID-19: A Possible Low-Cost Ally With a Wide Margin of Safety”

See all COVID-19 posts and all Vitamin C posts.

Best Vitamin C? It might be wise at the first sign of COVID-19 to use as much true Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C as your bowels will tolerate.

ARDS = Acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occurs when fluid builds up in the tiny, elastic air sacs (alveoli) in your lungs. The fluid keeps your lungs from filling with enough air, which means less oxygen reaches your bloodstream. This deprives your organs of the oxygen they need to function.

ARDS typically occurs in people who are already critically ill or who have significant injuries. Severe shortness of breath — the main symptom of ARDS — usually develops within a few hours to a few days after the precipitating injury or infection.

Many people who develop ARDS don't survive. The risk of death increases with age and severity of illness. Of the people who do survive ARDS, some recover completely while others experience lasting damage to their lungs.

Physicians Weekly: “High-Dose IV Vitamin C on ARDS by COVID-19: A Possible Low-Cost Ally With a Wide Margin of Safety”

Note “intravenous Vitamin C” reference, a topic I discuss in Vitamin C: a cure for lethal viral infections including Poliomyelitis, and could it cure COVID-19? The Groundbreaking Work of Doctor F.R. Klenner and How It was Ignored.

Intravenous vitamin C has been the object of numerous studies regarding its function as adjuvant therapy on critical patients’ care, included ARDS of diverse etiology. In the context of a coronavirus pandemic, with an elevated morbimortality and pressure over the sanitary system, it is of vital importance to use every available resource to improve patients’ outcomes in an accessible and safe way. In this article, I briefly analyze the evidence around the use of vitamin C in the critical patient and its potential benefits on admission time, intubation time and mortality on patients affected by ARDS.

...Humans are one of the few vertebrates that can’t synthesize vitamin C, therefore it is considered to be an essential nutrient. It’s estimated that 7% of the general population is deficient in vitamin C, but this percentage increases to 47% in admitted patients...

...Therapeutic effects are achieved with plasmatic levels in the range of 20-49 mmol/L (100 times higher than those achieved by oral intake) only possible with intravenous infusion.

...Regarding the evidence around vitamin C’s mechanisms of action, certain preclinical findings might explain the effects observed on respiratory distress. Vitamin C down-regulates inflammatory genes and inhibits the cytokine storm responsible for the activation of pulmonary neutrophils, therefore protecting alveolar capillaries from inflammatory damage. In addition to this, it enhances alveolary fluid clearance by increasing the water transporter channel expression.

In regards to its safety, most studies report no adverse effects on large doses of vitamin C. On rare occasions, the following have been described: Hypersensitivity, oxalate urolithiasis, iron overload in haemochromatosis and anaemia among others, most of them with a prevalence less than 1%. It has also been described the inaccuracy of bedside glucometry when using vitamin C and it is advised to corroborate findings with laboratory results.

We live in times of incalculable need. Worldwide medical supplies are in shortage, costs threat to crush even the wealthiest of health care systems, and above all the wellbeing of millions of humans is at risk. Treatment of severe ARDS from COVID-19 is an ongoing challenge and a specific treatment could be months ahead. The evidence around vitamin C is scarce but promising. There probably never was and never will be a better time than the current to explore and make use of every possible tool that could allow us to improve patients’ prognosis and expand the body of evidence for the benefit of all.

Kudos to the doctor who wrote this! But the risks are far smaller than virtually all prescription drugs, so the excessive caution is just ridiculous. When proper risk assessment is done, it goes beyond idiotic to not to move aggressively to intravenous Vitamin C for impacted patients.

AWESOME to see at least some doctors saying that nutrition may be a factor in mitigating COVID-19—which of course it is—nutrition being the most imporant factor of all fir a strong immune system and that starts by avoiding all nutritional deficiencies.

The reason that admitted patients are deficient in Vitamin C is that Vitamin C is used by the body to combat viruses and bacterio and their toxins. Very high dose intravenous Vitamin C has been proven to CURE severe viral illnesses in as little as 4 days. But this fact is little known, not in the accepted medical textbooks and ignored by the allopathic (traditional ) medical establishment. Studies showing it doesn’t work are awesomely flawed in failing to use the protocols of F. R. Klenner and therefore erroneously “prove” that it does not work.

WHY are we letting patients go acute when multiple nutritional deficiencies can be addressed for the entire population at a cost per person far less than 0.1% of the cost of a hospitalization? Deficiencies of Vitamin D deficiency, magnesium deficiency are tightly linked to immune system function. And why is intravenous Vitamin C not a top worldwide health priority? Maybe the same reason that the allopathic medical establishment ignores magnesium deficiency as a driver of the suffering and death of tens of millions—money and arrogance. Word is getting out but very slowly because few doctors dare to do anything but follow dogmatic medical practice—a fundamentally unethical approach to human health.

See all posts on ethics in medicine and articles like A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine.

Vitamin C: one of the Dietary Factors in preventing Macular Degeneration

See all COVID-19 posts.

Best Vitamin C?

WSJ: New Treatments for Macular Degeneration Are On the Way

Scientists may be just a few years away from delivering new treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in people more than 50 years old.

...“I’m cautiously optimistic that we will have markedly improved treatments for both wet and dry AMD within two to three years,” says Joshua Dunaief, professor of ophthalmology at the Scheie Eye Institute at the University of Pennsylvania.

....

Great! But why not prevent it in the first place? So now we need dangerous drugs to treat so manh conditions that could be prevented and sometimes cured by simple and indexpensive dietary supplements.

If medical doctors were doing their jobs instead of the elephant-in-the-room rampant medical malpractice of ignoring nutritional deficiences, the rate of hundreds of illnesses would plumment (hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, mental illness)... including macular degeneration.

Magnesium Deficiency Differentially Affects the Retina and Visual Cortex of Intact Rats

...our results suggest that the influence of Mg-D on the intact visual system may be different from previous studies that used isolated retinas. This difference may depend not only on the hyperactivity of the NMDA receptor, but also on the behavior of the Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions in the intact eye.

BMJ: Diet patterns and the incidence of age-related macular degeneration in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

Several studies suggest AMD patients should pay close attention to what they eat.

A study by researchers at the University at Buffalo published in the December issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology found that participants who ate an “American diet” high in red and processed meat, fried food, refined grains and high-fat dairy were three times as likely to develop advanced AMD as participants who were deemed “prudent” eaters.

Diet appeared to play no role in the incidence of early AMD. The study was adjusted for age, race, education, calorie intake and smoking status.

That followed the publication in March 2019 of a 21-year study of nearly 5,000 participants in Europe that found those who adhered to a Mediterranean diet—as measured by nine components, including the consumption of vegetables, fruits, fish and legumes—had a 41% reduced risk of developing advanced AMD. The study was published in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “Of the nine components, the most important was eating fish twice a week,” says Emily Chew, director of the National Eye Institute Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications and chair of the National Institutes of Health’s Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2. “Particularly for people who have protective genes associated with AMD, the fish effect is almost like a two-thirds reduction in the disease.”

Since the completion of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study in 2001, AMD patients have been encouraged to take a high-dose supplement of vitamins and minerals including vitamin C, vitamin E and lutein, a formulation that has been shown in clinical trials to reduce the progression to late AMD by 25%.

“Fish” as perhaps in Omega 3 fatty acids, below?

In general, the pattern of studies is that you find what you look for. Most researches are not at all creative, not even looking for things like magnesium deficiency, or using highly unreliable tests or making false assumptions about blood levels instead of tissue levels. So it’s important to look at many many studies.

Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects...

...

Photoreceptors are exposed to an extensive amount of oxidative stress in the form of light and oxygen... The chemical nature of nutrients should help predict which nutrients are crucial for the retina. Being a highly lipophilic tissue that is subject to environmental and age-related oxidative stress, one might anticipate that maintaining adequate levels of lipophilic antioxidants (polyunsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, vitamin E) would bring salutary effects. To some extent this is borne out in the results discussed below. However the situation is far more complex, with hydrophilic compounds such as sugars also apparently playing significant roles in retinal homeostasis and damage.... The combination of inadequate nutrition with the inability to properly degrade and dispose of cellular debris may contribute to the formation of deposits in the RPE-Bruch’s membrane region.

As might be expected given roles for complement in inflammatory pathways, inflammation is thought to play an important role in AMD pathology...

...Recent appreciation for the nutritional properties of the entire diet, rather than just antioxidants has led to investigations of the roles of macronutrients in AMD pathology...Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, especially long-chain omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) found in fish, have been associated with amelioration of a number of chronic diseases... Stronger evidence for a beneficial role of omega-3 fatty acids in eye health is found in two cross-sectional studies....Data from several additional prospective cohorts support a beneficial role of omega-3 fatty acids in reducing risk for any grade of AMD... The effect of fish intake on risk for AMD has been examined because fish is one of the most common dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids... consumption of at least 2 servings of fish per week was associated with decreased risk for neovascular AMD compared to 0 servings per week.

...In a double-blind, placebo controlled trial of dry AMD patients, it was shown that supplementation with vitamin E, zinc, magnesium, vitamin B6 and folate for 18 months maintained visual acuity, compared to placebo treatment, in which there was a decrease in visual acuity (p = 0.03). The antioxidant supplement group also reported greater vision stability in the areas of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity (p = 0.05) (Richer, 1996). Another double-blind, placebo controlled trial of dry AMD patients found that supplementation with antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids maintained visual acuity over 6 months, while the placebo group lost visual acuity...

Vitamin C is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent everywhere in the body, and magnesium deficiency may well be involved because it is involved in up to 800 enzymatic processes—and nutrients work in synergy in the body.

What about poisons such as statins, which hugely impact the body’s ability to repair and maintain tissues, by depressing life-giving cholesterol? Note the LACK OF ALL MENTION of statin poisons in the entire full article referenced above.

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SARS CoV2 aka COVID-19: Fraudulent Claims on UV LED Disinfecting Lights, Most from China

See all COVID-19 posts.

Dan Llewellyn of MaxMax.com writes:

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While shopping on Amazon recently, I noticed a number of people selling 'UVC LED Lamps' for disinfecting surfaces. One that caught my eye is advertised as a 100 Watt UVC bulb suitable for sterilizing the home, office, warehouse and supermarket. We have LED flashlights that range from 255nm to 1600nm with over 40 different wavelengths. There is not other shop in the world that carries the frequency range of LED flashlights - over 55 for our XNiteFlashF series. I also know that LED's below 350nm get very expensive and the lower the frequency, the more expensive. We have a 3 Watt 255nm LED light that costs over $600.

BTW, this is also why most of the UV LED's flashlights sold at places like Amazon are misrated. A small 400nm LED might cost $0.05/PC while a 365nm LED might cost $0.50/PC. Almost every UV LED manufactured in China is misrated by 10-20nm. So I figured if the 100 Watt 254nm LED being sold on Amazon, it would be an incredible bargain at $59.95, but I had my suspicions.

We have over 10 different spectrometers covering light from 180nm to 1600nm, and we have a variety of light integration spheres, fiber cables, calibrated light sources, tunable light sources, collimating lenses, cosine correctors, etc, etc.

UV light above 200nm is classified as:

UV-A 315nm-400nm
UV-B 280nm-315nm
UV-C 100nm-280nm

UV-A is the range where you have a blacklight tubes that you see in bars, discos, rave parties, etc. UVA is pretty innocuous. Over long periods of time with enough intensity, you can increase the likelihood of cataracts, but for the most part, you don't need to worry about it.

UV-B is the range where many tanning beds operate. You can get sunburned with UVB. Your body also uses UV-B light to create Vitamin D, so a bit of UVB is actually good for you.

UV-C is the range where the light is germicidal. The light will sterilize things but that is also dependent on the type of thing you are trying to kill, light intensity per unit area, wavelength and time of exposure. UV-C light can give you a cornea burn very quickly but you won't know for a few hours. We have a cheap plastic flashlight with a 4 Watt 254nm bulb that has about 1 Watt of output power. I once looked into it for about 3 seconds and 3 hours later, my eye felt llke I rubbed them with sandpaper. UVC light is no joke, and you need to take precautions when around it.

I measured the Amazon UV LED light, and found that, surprise, surprise, the light is a 395nm LED light. 395nm is not going to be killing anything so save your money on buying a similar bulb.

Below is the spectrometer measured output. Also includes is a trace of an actual 254nm Mercury low pressure germicidal bulb so that you can see the difference. The blue trace is the LED bulb and the red trace is a real germicidal bulb.

Spectral transmission of various UV light sources. Graph courtesy of MaxMax.com

Same data below, not as attractive, but gross pattern maybe easier to see.

Spectral transmission of various UV light sources. Graph courtesy of MaxMax.com

WIND: China gifted us COVID-19, and now is now defrauding us with products that further put people at risk.


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Magnesium Supplementation Personal Findings: Brain, Lungs and Asthma, Sleep, Urinary Flow, Muscle Spasms

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It, in particular, The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, MD, ND.

Comments apply to magnesium supplementation was built-up over ~2 weeks to ~1500mg/day using magnesium citrate and magnesium L-Threonate followed by a week of supplementation using ReMag. View all posts on magnesium.

Reflecting on many past health problems, I assert that magnesium deficiency was the likely cause in whole or at least in part. I further state that not one doctor in my life has ever even mentioned magnesium deficiency*.

A few days before writing this, I informed my internist that I had *cured* myself of the need for a prescription stimulant. It drew a blank stare. The attitude and lack of interest was not much different than his response to my asthma/CBD claim where he laughed and said that some patients swore by bear grease. This doctor makes the “top doctors” list in the San Francisco Bay Area, believe it or not. He seems to be a firm believer in the one symptom/one diagnosis/one drug approach to medicine. Nor does he have a clue that Vitamin C greatly diminishes the activity of this particular medicine, a fact found in the literature and personally verified.

A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine
Loserthink in Modern Medicine: Goal-Oriented instead of Systems-Oriented

Each medical issue that I detail here has been repeatedly and unequivocally shown by scientific study to be strongly correlated with magnesium deficiency yet not one doctor in 35 years ever has even mentioned magnesium to me*. While correlation is not causation, only a fool does not first address an underlying deficiency prior to doing anything else.

* Not mentioned and not tested-for. If a doctor tests for it, most will use the highly unreliable serum magnesium test instead of the much more reliable magnesium RBC test, which at least correlates strongly with the only good test, the ionized magnesium test.

Asthma

Since I acquired asthma and allergies from a nasty viral infection at the age of ~21, I have had asthma that for the first 10 years or so after was quite bad. For the past 20 years, it has largely been a “treat as needed” thing with a prescription inhaler, set off by dust or allergies or cold.

Personal experience: magnesium supplementation has calmed my lungs down very effectively so much so that I have given up the prescription inhaler. Instead of the inhaler, I used 400mg magnesium citrate when needed, such as inhaling dust in very windy conditions. I can feel the bronchospasms ease and then go away within 30 minutes. This is at least as effective as the prescription inhaler, with no side effects I have noted.

A week into using ReMag and with the pine pollen in the air heavy (I am highly allergic to it), I have lungs as open and clear in the smallest airways as I have had in three decades—and no prescription inhaler. Magnesium is a known relaxer of small airway tissues. No, the magnesium does not fully block some reaction if I get a strong puff of pollen, but the lungs quickly settle down again—unprecedented in 30 years.

Brain and memory

After a horrible time last year (lingering issues from concussion ), I resorted to a prescription stimulant for ADD and mental fatigue, lest I be financially devastated by an inability to focus or concentrate (months of very poor work are extremely discouraging, to say the least).

Personal experience: a year of that stimulant was critical. It helped with neurogenesis and brain repair, of that I am sure. But about 2 weeks after considerable magnesium supplementation, I now definitely have better brain function (attention span, alertness, concentration, etc). Not only that, I feel no desire for the stimulant (stopped it cold turkey for a week now, as I write this), though it remains to seen if I might still need it occasionally for attentional problems (one of the lingering side effects of my concussion). OTOH maybe the magnesium will completely resolve attention issue. My memory also seems stronger and I am not forgetting things—a known benefit of magnesium. The change is almost startling—I can remind myself of things and remember them later in the day, and that has been a problem for 2+ years since my concussion.

Two days into using ReMag with fairly heavy dosing, I experienced a remarkably alert day all day—focus and alertness without any prescription drug. I would liken it to a double dose of the prescription stimulant I have abandoned.

There is considerable scientific support for magnesium being neuroprotective and neuro-repairative. And yet... none of my doctors never mentioned magnesium before or after my concussion (or ever). Not internists, not ER doctors, not neurologists. Such ignorance rises to medical malpractice, damaging me more and longer than necessary (years). Ditto for the neurologists and my peripheral neuropathy. Willful ignorance is at best a rationalization unworthy of any professional. Shame on all of them.

Muscle spasms

Muscle spasms (sometimes extremely painful) have been an ongoing problem for some years now, so much so that a prescription muscle relaxant was my only recourse. There is considerable science to support the effectiveness of magnesium for muscle relaxation and elimination of muscle spasms.

Personal experience: muscle spasms GONE and muscles more limber and flexible.

Left chest wall pain/tightness

This issue is not cardiac in nature. It has been painful enough to disable me for part of a day with fatigue/pain. I suspect some kind of intercostal muscle spasm but that’s just a guess.

Personal experience: diminishing, have hardly noticed in recent 10 days, no attacks. Vanished completely after one day of ReMag and has not come back over the ensuing week.

Irregular heartbeat

When highly trained in past years, I suffered an irregular heart beat (skipped beat, then extra powerful beat), so annoying that it would keep me from sleeping. I now believe it was caused by magnesium deficiency. To test that theory, I have to attain a comparable level of fitness.

Sleep

I’ve been suffering sleep quality issues ever since my concussion.

Personal experience: waking up far less often. However, I still seem to have a body clock that is 20 hours or so, throwing me out of sync with the day. So my sleep cycle remains a problem since my concussion. I doubt that magnesium can fix a brain wiring issue, but I won’t rule out some improvement over time.

Frequent urination, difficulty urinating

Getting up to pee 5 to 10 times a night blows. That has been going on for years.

Personal experience: frequency is down to 2 to 3 times per night unless I drink a great deal of fluid or bulky food with a lot of water in it—that situation is to be expected. Flow is greatly improved, steady and without problems. This is already a sea change. It is known that calcium can be deposited in the bladder (and elsewhere) due to inadequate magnesium, and in the bladder it results in the need for frequent urination. Magnesium can steadily pull that calcium back into solution and it can then be excreted.

Coronary artery calcification / atherosclerosis / cholesterol

This one will take longer to assess and requires therapeutic doses of magnesium via ReMag. At the least, I expect to see a halt to my coronary artery calcification — I was tested this year again and saw a troubling substantial year-over-year worsening vs last year. I hope for reversal and will know in one year when I get retested.

Night vision

This has been a problem for me in recent years, and getting worse.

Personal experience: I was able to see adequately last night using the light of only (roughly) half the moon while hiking back on an 18 mile hike.

Blood pressure

Has been generally good but variable from 116/68 to 130/84. I want to see a consistent 116/68 or so. I don’t have my blood pressure monitor along this trip, so this one is a TBD.

Immune system

Only time will tell. But last year’s nasty prostate infection which resulted in horrible malaise from the nasty antibiotics are not something I care to ever repeat. I also think that some of these infections may be the direct result of magnesium deficiency weakening the immune system along with calcification in body tissues.

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Pseudo-KETO: Three Months on a Low Carbohydrate and Low Sugar Diet

Some say that “sugar is more addictive than heroin” .

I cannot attest to that claim, since I have never use heroin and never will. But I can say that breaking the sugar habit can be very difficult, particularly the first week, and especially with intense exercise involved.

I’ve been on the road for 3+ months in my Sprinter van, doing my usual photography field work. During that time I eliminated all added sugar with few exceptions. I also cut my carbohydrate intake way down.

On the whole, I can say that eliminating sugar and most carbs has worked out very well. But I cannot attribute any health gains to it, and recovery and performance are impaired without some carbs.

Exception, candy bar frenzy, early March: after a double century where I did not eat much after finishing, the next day I bought ten (10) candy bars and promptly ate eight (8) of them in two hours (Payday and Milky Way)—about 2400 calories. No ill effects and I finished off the other two the next morning for a total of 3000 calories. The drive to eat those bars was powerful and I yielded to it, though that was supposed to have been a ten day supply. My suspicion is that it is far better to binge-eat than to drag it out, hence my historical habits with See’s Candy (chocolates).

Carbs ===> Fats

The only way to cut back carbs successfully is to greatly increase the intake of fat. For that purpose, I use nuts, avocados, olive oil, coconut oil, MCTs from coconut oil, wild salmon, eggs, grass-fed ghee, whole fat yogurt from high-grade milk preferably grass-fed (Strauss Greek Whole Milk is superb) and animal fat from grass-fed meat*. All organic. I do not eat factory food.

For me it takes 7-10 days for the candy/sugar craving to go away. After that, the craving is reduced to a ghost of its former self, but this trip I found that it was not completely gone even after a month. I have concluded that intense exercise reawakens candy/sugar craving on a short-term basis, so the key is to eat nutrient dense foods that have low but significant carbohydrates in them—e.g., whole milk yogurt, fresh fruit and veggies, etc.

Sugar equivalent while riding

Tailwind Nutrition sports drink endurance fuel

The key with moderately high intensity endurance exercise is to maintain both blood glucose levels and electrolyte levels. For that, I use Tailwind. Any left-over I use post-workout, as the muscles need some carbohydrates (along with protein) for recovery.

I find it difficult to exceed about 2.5 hours of riding without some energy input. Plus I will have lost at least 2L of fluid, and as much as 6L if intensity is high in high heat. Thus it is critical to hydrate, and water sucks since it absorbs much more slowly than a proper sports drink. For that, I swear by Tailwind, which contains both electrolytes and dextrose (turns directly into blood glucose). BTW, do NOT use products like Gatorade for endurance exercise (lacks key electrolytes and contains sucrose or fructose which burden the liver and forestall immediate availability).

High exercise levels not compatible with pure Keto

The biggest problem I have faced in cutting back on carbohydrates (“carbs”) is that under a training load averaging 1600 KCal per day, my body cannot restore its glycogen stores in 24 hours. Too little carbohydrate leads to impaired recovery and impaired energy levels. So far, my body just cannot do enough gluconeogenesis in 24 hours to restore muscle and liver stores of glycogen to full levels. So the “tank” is not full the next day and over a few days, performance drops quickly.

I just do not believe the Keto folks who make their near-zero carb claims—let them eat fat and see if another 55 year old can keep up with my workouts, and then we’ll talk. Keto in a serious athletic context sounds like an out of balance dogma. As to “office-chair Keto”—sure, why not since glycogen demands are modest.

While I have a very highly trained aerobic system capable of burning fat for daylong events, the aerobic system is insufficient when energy demands increase beyond aerobic inputs. That means using glycogen for a substantial part of energy production. At age 55 my power output is down 15% or so versus age 46, but even so we are talking about 250 watts or so on a 8% grade (when well rested).

By around 8000' elevation, my lungs are heaving and totally maxed-out to maintain ~250 watts—there is not enough oxygen to produce the required power any more—total power drops regardless and lots of glycogen starts being utilized. The anaerobic energy demands rapidly depletes glycogen stores. This is true even on the flats—the body will always “burn” some glycogen. Plus the visual system of the brain has very high demands for glycogen to cope with image analysis on a bicycle—just try having a concussion and you’ll figure that out quickly.

Over the past 3 months, I have experienced intense cravings for anything sweet. These cravings slowly fall off to a low level after a week, but the first week it is very hard to resist buying something high in sugar like a candy bar or licorice—mind you my sugar consumption has been very moderate for years compared to most of the population.

* I am not worried about the discredited ever-changing and never-proven cholesterol hypothesis quackery vs atherosclerosis—anti-scientific piffle. Atherosclerosis is surely the result of oxidized LDL stemming from inflammatory processes along with magnesium deficiency.

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Just Say 'Yes' to Powerful Drugs: The Great Majority of Medical Doctors Wallow in Nutritional Ignorance

View all posts on magnesium.

Recent experiences with magnesium follow below.

Learning must be lifelong in any field, but particularly when health is concerned and it’s your job to maximize health.

Shame on MDs who ignore nutritional deficiencies or proven treatments just because medical textbooks did not include them in the edition in force during training.

I don’t fault any MD who was unaware and untrained in nutrition who then becomes aware and takes action to fix the knowledge deficiency. Sadly, none of my doctors have ever engaged their brains on nutrition! On the flip side, no one should ever be faulted for doing the right thing “too late”, since just about any right thing could have been done sooner.

So—kudos to MDs willing and eager to grow their knowledge and to change their practice accordingly. Kudos to MDs who thrive on the knowledge that patients can teach them a thing or two, if only they choose to listen and observe—versus paint-by-numbers medicine. Kudos to MDs who come to the realization that much of what they learned in medical school has been debunked and that much was left out.

Kudos to MDs who realize that conclusions in medical studies are often unwarranted unsupportable bunk based on ill-conceived testing protocols, with conclusions often influenced by cognitive dissonance and confirmation bias. For those reasons, reading conclusions in medical studies is intellectually indefensible—at least some skimming/scanning must be done to see whether the conclusions may be misleading, or even indefensible.

Practicing medicine without an intellectual basis for it

See: A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine

No organism can enjoy health when deprived of critical nutrients, yet this is precisely how modern medicine operates. I speak especially of magnesium deficiency, but also of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin K. But also the healing powers of Vitamin C against toxins/poisons and against viruses and bacteria and their toxins—efficacy willfully ignored and “debunked” by studies intentionally ignoring the protocols of per F.R. Klenner and then falsely claiming lack of efficacy.

Some readers might think my prior posts on health have been much too critical of doctors. But the more I learn and prove to myself the reality that I myself was ill served by modern medicine, I am now thinking I was too kind.

It is not the past which I am condemning, but the failure to take immediate and intensive effort to fix the intellectual deficit. The right thing done “too late” is still worthy of praise.

So I am now doubling down: I assert that most doctors are grossly ignorant of nutrition and therefore incompetent because they fail to consider nutrient deficiency. Willful ignorance in the face of tens of thousands of studies rises to medical malpractice, which is not infrequently based on financial conflicts of interest.

Shame on every doctor who fails to consider*, for example, magnesium for hypertension, blood sugar, migraines, neuropathy, neurological protection and repair, coronary artery calcification, and dozens of other conditions before resorting to dangerous drugs. Yes, all those things can result from magnesium deficiency and it is only one of many nutrients. Not one of my doctors ever even mentioned magnesium in my lifetime.

Not trained in nutrition and apparently uninterested in the health robustness that comes from proper nutrition, doctors as a group wallow in their ignorance and have become dispensers of poisons of many types (eg statins), with unjustified cognitive commitments and confirmation biases instilled in medical schools where “knowledge” is regularly debunked and studies are conflicting and barely plausible due to statistical manipulation to suit funding sponsors, and shot through with financial and ethical conflicts—then taken as the basis for one-size-fits-all guidelines which often are little better than quackery

Doctors now apply epidemiological pseuedo-science to individuals in so many areas even while ignoring critical nutritional requirements: “here are your drugs, you will never be cured, take them the rest of your life along with the additional drugs that will be needed due to damaging the body with the starting drug and failing to make any attempt at health”. It is a huge reeking manure pile of intellectual and ethical malfeasance.

Were I a doctor, I don’t know how I could look myself in the mirror until I thoroughly expanded my knowledge of nutrition, since everything in health rests upon it. If only 10% of my patients could be helped and perhaps cured by nutritional means, wouldn’t I have the strongest ethical obligation to do so? Medical ethics seem to be an oxymoron. A

It is a sad state of affairs for anyone with a health problem.

For a global health crisis caused by the disturbing mentality of the modern medical establishment, see BMJ: “Subclinical magnesium deficiency: a principal driver of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis”.


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Vitamin C: Best Most Bioavailable Form?

See all COVID-19 posts.

Maybe high-dose Vitamin C can beat COVID-19 and other viruses as suggested by the work of F.R Klenner, and maybe not. That is pure speculation on my part. Most doctors will scoff, so take that at face value—but you can bet that very few have even thought about it, or have any clue as to the research.

If intravenous Vitamin C is not available (outpatient setting at health care facility), I’d bet on true lipospheric Vitamin C in properly administered dosing over any official treatment for COVID-19, none of which work in a meaningful way.

NOTE: lipospheric is NOT “liposomal”, see below.

At the least, Vitamin C detoxifies numerous substances, so in that regard, it is a no-brainer when infected, because viruses and bacteries release various toxins into the body, and other toxins can accumulate when the body is weakened.

Best and highest bioavailable Vitamin C

Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C

My research is not yet done, and there may be more than one top-flight brand, but apparently not very many. Two brands that look like the real deal for true Lypo–Spheric Vitamin C, are:

Don’t be confused by “liposomal Vitamin C”, which can be little more than a mix of Vitamin C and lipids—not encapsulated spheres. It will be cheaper, but it is not the same thing! Which is not to say it is bad or ineffective, just that its bioavailability may be notably less and it might behave inconsistently across individuals. It’s not clear that any price premium for liposomal vs regualar Vitamin C is worth it.

Bottom line is that if you want to the best and most predictable bioavailability, true Lypo-Spheric Vitamin C is the way to go. By virtue of very high bioavailability, something far more meaningful can be said as to whether Vitamin C treatment worked or not versus the variable bioavailability of other products in different bodies.

Alpha lipoic acid is also an anti-oxidant: see alpha lipoic acid in LypriCel Liposomal R-Alpha and Aurora Nutrascience, Mega-Liposomal R-Alpha Lipoic Acid.

Best regular Vitamin C

There are many good brands out there.

  • Keep in mind that conventional Vitamin C is only about 20% bioavailable.
  • With conventional Vitamin C, your body will excrete (pee out) most of it.
  • At higher doses, some brands may give you a massive upset stomach and/or diarrhea (I took 9000mg once of one brand for an impending viral infection, and it bloated me up like 3-day-old roadkill—one of the most unpleasant days of my life and quite painful.

Result can vary! I’ve had good luck with:


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Vitamin C: Detoxifies Acetaldehyde (breakdown product of alcohol)

Best Vitamin C?

Toxins are best avoided.

And... alcohol is a toxin, well acetaldehyde is, and Vitamin C detoxifies that acetaldehyde.

So in the interest of science, I guess I have no choice in the matter: testing how pre-dosing with Vitamin C works vs a suitable acoholic agent.

It might take a lot of testing to do it right (e.g., number of shots vs how much C).

But science can be hard and someone has to do the dirty work. I ran one preliminary test with champagne, and as far as I could tell when I woke up, it went really well with 2000mg Vitamin C pre-dosing. I think.

Of course, the counfounding influences of how many limes and whether sea salt amount matters all mean that this might have to be a long-term trial to establish correlations (causation is such a bother with serious medical studies).

Sorry, so far this is a very small study and no additional participants can be accommodated at this time, not unless a fully independent sponsor like Don Julio gets on board*, which would allow a much larger cohort.

* Were it to be a fully medically defensible half-blnd study, then an uninterested party like the Mexican Tequila Consortium would provide the test agent (including morning doses), as well as collecting, analyzing data and drawing scientifically robust conlusions—just like statin trials. All data would of course remain confidential (just like many statin trials), just in case study participants were to become belligerant. Due to the nature if the study, it would not be ethical to discontinue the trial until scientific certainty had been reached (the reverse of statin trials, which should be stopped quickly if trend lines show any sign of disagreeing with the obvious outcome).

Test agent for detoxifying effects of Vitamin C

 


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Vitamin C: a cure for lethal viral infections including Poliomyelitis, and could it cure COVID-19? The Groundbreaking Work of Doctor F.R. Klenner and How It was Ignored

See all COVID-19 posts.

Best Vitamin C?

To be clear, there is NO EVIDENCE I am aware of that Vitamin C can cure COVID-19 (other than the F.R. Klenner work cited below, which in proper dosing is claimed to kill many viruses).

And I don’t expect any to emerge, since no drug company wants to waste money on trialing a product that cannot be patented, no matter how effective it might be. After all, if obvious fraud shut down nearly all trials of hydroxychloroquine, what the hell can we expect from our gullible “experts” some of WHOm still insist that masks are not needed unless caring for a COVID-19 patient?

Most doctors are complicit in that mentality for all diseases, an ugly truth of modern medicine. Doctors are now employed directly by hospitals and soon drug companies will own the hospitals, a nauseating prospect for health and well being.

And yet since there is no effective treatment known as I write this, my personal approach would be to take as much Vitamin C as my gut could tolerate (preferably liposomal Vitamin C) because at the least it has been well proven to neutralize toxins.

...

The jury is definitely out as far as mainstream allopathic medicine goes, but there are hints that the way Vitamin C has been treated is another “statin fiasco”, but in the opposite sense.

While statins are poisons inflicted on the public based on a never-proven constantly-changing cholesterol hypothesis drive by money, status and patent profits. Whereas Vitamin C is essential to life and was proven to cure “untreatable” viral infections with no toxicity even at extremely high doses (too much water can kill you, so is water toxic?).

The fiasco part? So far, what I am seeing is that studies that actually test the Dr F.R. Klenner protocols seem to have been studiously avoided by the modern medical establishment, with the wrong protocols used to “prove” that Vitamin C doesn’t work. And if it’s not mentioned in medical texts, it doesn’t exist as far as modern medicine is concerned (99% of doctors).

The published findings of F.R. Klenner are fascinating, and none other than Nobel Laureate Linus Pauling was a staunch Vitamin C proponent.

Hidden In Plain Sight: The Pioneering Work of Frederick Robert Klenner, M.D

Some physicians would stand by and see their patient die rather than use ascorbic acid because in their finite minds it exists only as a vitamin. –F. R. Klenner, MD

It has been reported that one of the mold-derived drugs, in addition to being a good antibiotic, is a super-vitamin. Conversely, we argue that Vitamin C, besides being an essential vitamin, is a super- antibiotic. Vitamin C in vitro, if maintained at body temperature, inactivates certain toxins at an unbelievable rate.

The Treatment of Poliomyelitis and Other Virus Diseases with Vitamin C, by Fred R. Klenner, M.D.

IN A PREVIOUS REPORT dealing with the antagonistic properties of ascorbic acid to the virus of atypical pneumonia, mention was made of the fact that other types of virus infections had responded favorably to vitamin C. This paper is to present these findings as well as the results of subsequent studies on the virus of poliomyelitis, the viruses causing measles, mumps, chickenpox, herpes zoster, herpes simplex and influenza. Further studies with the virus of atypical pneumonia will also be discussed.

These observations of the action of ascorbic acid on virus diseases were made independently of any knowledge of previous studies using vitamin C on virus pathology, except for the negative report of Sabin after treating Rhesus monkeys experimentally infected with the poliomyelitis virus. A review of the literature in preparation of this paper, however, presented an almost unbelievable record of such studies. The years of labor in animal experimentations; the cost in human effort and in “grants,” and the volumes written, make it difficult to understand how so many investigators could have failed in comprehending the one thing that would have given positive results a decade ago. This one thing was the size of the dose of vitamin C employed and the frequency of its administration. In all fairness it must be said that Jungeblut noted on several occasions that he attributed his failure of results to the possibility that the strength of his injectable “C” was inadequate. It was he who unequivocally said that “vitamin C can truthfully be designated as the antitoxic and antiviral vitamin.”

In the poliomyelitis epidemic in North Carolina in 1948, 60 cases of this disease came under our care. These patients presented all or almost all of these signs and symptoms: Fever of 101 to 104.6°, headache, pain at the back of the eyes, conjunctivitis, scarlet throat; pain between the shoulders, the back of the neck, one or more extremity, the lumbar back; nausea, vomiting and constipation. In 15 of these cases the diagnosis was confirmed by lumbar puncture; the cell count ranging from 33 to 125...

The treatment employed was vitamin C in massive doses. It was given like any other antibiotic every two to four hours. The initial dose was 1000 to 2000 mg., depending on age...

Two patients in this series of 60 regurgitated fluid through the nose. This was interpreted as representing the dangerous bulbar type. For a patient in this category postural drainage, oxygen administration, in some cases tracheotomy, needs to be instituted, until the vitamin C has had sufficient time to work — in our experience 36 hours. Failure to recognize this factor might sacrifice the chance of recovery. With these precautions taken, every patient [WIND: 60 patients] of this series recovered uneventfully within three to five days.

...Chickenpox gave equally good response...

...Many cases of influenza were treated with vitamin C...

...The response of virus encephalitis to ascorbic acid therapy was dramatic. Six cases of virus encephalitis were treated and cured with vitamin C injections...

...The use of vitamin C in measles proved to be a medical curiosity...It was our privilege to observe this picture over and over in two little volunteer girls for 30 days. These “research helpers” were my own little daughters. The measles virus was eventually destroyed in this instance by continuing 12,000 mg. by mouth each 24 hours for four days. We interpreted this result to indicate that on withdrawing the drug with the cessation of signs and symptoms, a small quantity of the virus remained, which after another incubation period produced anew the first stage of measles; when the drug was continued beyond the clearing stage the virus was destroyed in toto. No case of post-measles bronchopneumonia was seen...

...Of mumps, 33 cases were treated with ascorbic acid. When vitamin C was given at the peak of the infection the fever was gone within 24 hours, the pain within 36 hours, the swelling in 48 to 72 hours...

...Further studies on virus pneumonia showed that the clinical response was better when vitamin C was given to these patients according to the dose schedule outlined for poliomyelitis...

...

In using vitamin C as an antibiotic no factor of toxicity need be considered. To confirm this observation 200 consecutive hospital patients were given ascorbic acid, 500 to 1000 mg. every four to six hours, for five to ten days. One volunteer received 100,000 mg. in a 12-day period. It must be remembered that 90 per cent of these patients did not have a virus infection to assist in destroying the vitamin. In no instance did examination of the blood or urine indicate any toxic reaction, and at no time were there any clinical manifestations of a reaction to the drug. When vitamin C was given by mouth one per cent of these patients vomited shortly after taking the drug. In half of these cases the vomiting was controlled by increasing the carbohydrate content of the mixture. This reaction was not interpreted as representing a toxic manifestation; rather it was thought to be due to a hypersensitive gastric mucosa. The dose was reduced from 1000 to 100 mg. in young children showing this complex; vomiting occurred as before. However, in these same patients administration of massive, frequent doses of vitamin C by needle effected a cure of the infection without causing vomiting.

From a review of the literature one can safely state that in all instances of experimental work with ascorbic acid on the virus organism the amount of virus used was beyond the range of the administered dose of this vitamin. No one would expect to relieve kidney colic with a five-grain aspirin tablet; by the same logic we cannot hope to destroy the virus organism with doses of vitamin C of 10 to 400 mg. The results which we have reported in virus diseases using vitamin C as the antibiotic may seem fantastic. These results, however, are no different from the results we see when administering the sulfa, or the mold-derived drugs against many other kinds of infections. In these latter instances we expect and usually get 48- to 72-hour cures; it is laying no claim to miracle-working then, when we say that many virus infections can be cleared within a similar time limit.

Incredible. But Vitamin C cannot be patented, so the modern medical establishment steadfastly seems to have ignored the protocols and “proved” these results wrong.

The Origin of the 42-Year Stonewall of Vitamin C, by Robert Landwehr

In the late spring of 1949 the United States was in the grip of its worst poliomyelitis epidemic ever. On June 10 a paper on ways to save the lives of bulbar polio victims was read at the Annual Session of the American Medical Association (subsequently printed in its journal, JAMA, September 3, 1949, pages 1-8, volume 141, no. 1). Following the talk members of the audience were invited to comment. The first speaker, a leading authority from Pasadena, focused on details of tracheotomy techniques caused when paralyzed breathing, swallowing and coughing muscles of victims threatened their lives. Why the next person was recognized is puzzling. The only national recognition he had received — and it was obviously very limited — was that his picture appeared in Ebony in 1947 for having delivered of a deaf-mute black woman the first known surviving, identical quadruplets in the country. Here is the abstract of his remarks as recorded in JAMA.

Dr. F. R. Klenner, Reidsville, N.C.: It might be interesting to learn how polio- myelitis was treated in Reidsville, N.C., during the 1948 epidemic. In the past seven years, virus infections have been treated and cured in a period of seventy-two hours by the employment of massive frequent injections of ascorbic acid, or vitamin C. I believe that if vitamin C in these massive doses — 6,000 to 20,000 mg in a twenty- four hour period — is given to these patients with poliomyelitis none will be paralyzed and there will be no further maiming or epidemics of poliomyelitis."

...One can imagine the silence that must have greeted this sweeping, out-of-place declaration by a small-town general practitioner.

The empirical, clinical basis for Klenner's statement is found in his paper "The Treatment of Poliomyelitis and Other Virus Diseases with Vitamin C", published in the July 1949 issue of the Journal of Southern Medicine and Surgery. On pages 211-212 he writes:

THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHERN MEDICINE AND SURGERY: Massive Doses of Vitamin C and the Virus Diseases, F. R. KLENNER, M.D

It has been reported that one of the mold-derived drugs, in addition to being a good antibiotic, is a super-vitamin. Conversely, we argue that Vitamin C, besides being an essential vitamin, is a super- antibiotic. Vitamin C in vitro, if maintained at body temperature, inactivates certain toxins at an unbelievable rate.

...It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the degree of neutralization in a virus infection will be in proportion to the concentration of the vitamin and the length of time in which it is employed.

...Vitamin C, likewise, is important, not only as a detoxifying agent, as a catalyst aiding cellular respiration by acting as a hydrogen transport, as a catalyst in the assimilation of iron, and as a conservator of collagen fibers and bundles in tissues of mesenchymal origin; but, also, because of its function as a reducing agent or the precursor of such a substance. In this latter capacity it fulfills the requirements of an antibiotic. A striking phenomenon of vitamin C is the similarity of response, whether to correct pathologic processes due to a deficiency of this compound, acting as a vitamin; or to destroy the ferments of microorganisms, acting as an antibiotic.

A few key points of Dr. Klenners work on Vitamin C include (1) many viruses and bacteria kill by toxins and Vitamin C neutralizes those toxin, (2) some viral effects are in effect “focal” (localized) scurvy which can lead to severe problems from bleeding, (3) Vitamin C interferes with viral replication but enough must be used and long enough to overwhelm the virus very much a therapeutic threshold response, which varies by the viral and toxic load.


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Fraud in the Study of Hydroxychloroquine: can you trust medical experts of any kind any more?

See all COVID-19 posts.

Is it fraud, or is it more political deception, abetted by the incompetence of “highly respected” medical journals? Or both.

How could a respected journal publish papers based on data of unknown provenance? Isn’t there anyone with even a half-decent bullshit meter at work at The Lancet? It’s not even bad journalism (and even bad journalism is long gone), and it should make anyone skeptical of anything and everything in a medical journal.

The WHO’s feckless bureaucracy failed here also and it has done no better sorting fact from fiction on anything for a long time now.

But this is all part and parcel of a medical establishment that still thinks poison saves lives based on studies rife with conflicts of interest and unreleased data and cut-short trials—there is nothing new here really—same modus operandi where medical ethics are strictly limited in scope when it comes to drug trials.

Sciencemag.org: A mysterious company’s coronavirus papers in top medical journals may be unraveling

On its face, it was a major finding: Antimalarial drugs touted by the White House as possible COVID-19 treatments looked to be not just ineffective, but downright deadly. A study published on 22 May in The Lancet used hospital records procured by a little-known data analytics company called Surgisphere to conclude that coronavirus patients taking chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine were more likely to show an irregular heart rhythm—a known side effect thought to be rare—and were more likely to die in the hospital.

Within days, some large randomized trials of the drugs—the type that might prove or disprove the retrospective study’s analysis—screeched to a halt. Solidarity, the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) megatrial of potential COVID-19 treatments, paused recruitment into its hydroxychloroquine arm, for example.

But just as quickly, the Lancet results have begun to unravel—and Surgisphere, which provided patient data for two other high-profile COVID-19 papers, has come under withering online scrutiny from researchers and amateur sleuths. They have pointed out many red flags in the Lancet paper, including the astonishing number of patients involved and details about their demographics and prescribed dosing that seem implausible. “It began to stretch and stretch and stretch credulity,” says Nicholas White, a malaria researcher at Mahidol University in Bangkok. Today, The Lancet issued an Expression of Concern (EOC) saying “important scientific questions have been raised about data” in the paper and noting that “an independent audit of the provenance and validity of the data has been commissioned by the authors not affiliated with Surgisphere and is ongoing, with results expected very shortly.”

...

The Lancet at least is trying to correct its ineptitude, so maybe its reputation can remain somewhat above that of tabloid trash talk journalism.

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Magnesium Deficiency — “BMJ: just 6–12 weeks of strenuous physical activity can lead to magnesium deficiency”

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It, in particular, The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, MD, ND.

See my recent experiences with magnesium supplementation.

See my more detailed post on this BMJ article.

This caught my eye, since I engage in year-round strenuous activity, averaging 1000 KCal/day during training season, and at least 800 KCal/day on a 365-day average.

After several weeks of strenuous physical activity, serum magnesium can increase with no change in erythrocyte magnesium levels despite a reduction in mononuclear cell magnesium levels. The authors of a study concluded that the reduction in mononuclear cell magnesium content ‘reflects a reduction in exchangeable magnesium body stores, and the onset of a magnesium deficiency state’.

This study also indicates that just 6–12 weeks of strenuous physical activity can lead to magnesium deficiency. Another study concluded: ‘Serum and urinary magnesium concentrations decrease during endurance running, consistent with the possibility of magnesium deficiency. This may be related to increased demand in skeletal muscle’.

For some years now, I have been puzzled why my peak fitness comes around mid-May and then inexplicably tends to decline and/or I have puzzling periods of weakness—which makes no sense at all(not a rest issue). At that point I typically have done six double centuries and burned about 1500 KCal/day on average since January—way more than enough to deplete magnesium. My working theory is that in spite of a 3000 to 3500 calorie per day diet (more food intake = more magnesium), I push myself into magnesium deficiency.

This year was messed up with most events canceled, but even so, I have kept my activity level fairly high. So my recent feel-better findings after magnesium supplementation are consistent with that theory and with everything I ponder about the past ten years of strenuous activity.


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BMJ: “Subclinical magnesium deficiency: a principal driver of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis”

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It, in particular, The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, MD, ND.

See my recent experiences with magnesium supplementation.

You may be reacting to prior posts by thinking I’ve gone off the deep end of accusing doctors of medical malpractice and gross ignorance of nutrition and nutrition deficiencies. But I am being far too kind given the worldwide health crisis and horrible suffering caused by this appalling professional ineptitude.

And with COVID-19, I wonder just how many deaths are resulting from nutrient deficiences caused by less than optimal health which at least for magnesium deficiency is very easy to fix.

“First, do no harm”

Doctors as a rule do not test for magnesium deficiency (or use the wrong test if they do) and therefore do not treat it, and thereby undermine patient health. Moreover, baseline amounts are a minimum not enough for optimal health.

This failure is nothing short of medical malpratice, because it puts patients at high risk for hundreds of maladies including very serious ones like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, not to mention weakening the immune system. What is going on with modern medical doctors to allow this callously incompetent situation to continue?

A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine

Selected excerpts, emphasis added. Be sure to read the entire paper. It is mind-blowing just how awful modern medicine has failed us.

BMJ: Subclinical magnesium deficiency: a principal driver of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis

Abtract — Because serum magnesium does not reflect intracellular magnesium, the latter making up more than 99% of total body magnesium, most cases of magnesium deficiency are undiagnosed. Furthermore, because of chronic diseases, medications, decreases in food crop magnesium contents, and the availability of refined and processed foods, the vast majority of people in modern societies are at risk for magnesium deficiency. Certain individuals will need to supplement with magnesium in order to prevent suboptimal magnesium deficiency, especially if trying to obtain an optimal magnesium status to prevent chronic disease. Subclinical magnesium deficiency increases the risk of numerous types of cardiovascular disease, costs nations around the world an incalculable amount of healthcare costs and suffering, and should be considered a public health crisis. That an easy, cost-effective strategy exists to prevent and treat subclinical magnesium deficiency should provide an urgent call to action.

... despite renal conservation, magnesium can be pulled from the bone (as well as muscles and internal organs) in order to maintain normal serum magnesium levels when intakes are low. Thus, a normal serum magnesium level does not rule out magnesium deficiency, which predisposes to osteopaenia, osteoporosis and fractures...

... in order to prevent chronic diseases, we need to change our mindset away from exclusively treating acute illness and instead focus more on treating the underlying causes of chronic diseases, such as magnesium deficiency.

There are two types of nutrient deficiencies, frank deficiencies (such as scurvy from ascorbic acid deficiency or goitre from iodine deficiency) and subclinical deficiencies (a clinically silent reduction in physiological, cellular and/or biochemical functions). It is the latter that is most concerning as it is hard to diagnose and predisposes to numerous chronic diseases. And while both result in negative health consequences, the former has obvious symptoms (hence frank deficiency), whereas the latter may have negative or variable health effects that are not so apparent (eg, vascular calcification). The evidence in the literature suggests that subclinical magnesium deficiency is rampant and one of the leading causes of chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and early mortality around the globe, and should be considered a public health crisis.

...In other words, children are overfed and undernourished. One expert has argued that a typical Western diet may provide enough magnesium to avoid frank magnesium deficiency, but it is unlikely to maintain high-normal magnesium levels and provide optimal risk reduction from coronary artery disease and osteoporosis... In other words, most people need an additional 300 mg of magnesium per day in order to lower their risk of developing numerous chronic diseases. So while the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for magne- sium (between 300 and 420mg/day for most people) may prevent frank magnesium deficiency, it is unlikely to provide optimal health and longevity, which should be the ultimate goal.

...much of the population may not even be meeting the RDA for magnesium... around half (48%) of the US population consumes less than the recommended amount of magnesium from food... substantial number of people may be at risk for Mg deficiency, especially if concomitant disorders and/ or medications place the individual at further risk for Mg depletion... large percentage of Americans may be at risk of negative magnesium balance... since many individuals may be consuming below 320mg/day of magnesium, this poses a major public health threat.

...correlation between the low magnesium consumption in food and the prevalence of risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, such as hyperlipoproteinaemia, arterial hypertension and body weight.

...Hypomagnesemia is a relatively common occurrence in clinical medicine. That it often goes unrecognized is due to the fact that magnesium levels are rarely evaluated since few clinicians are aware of the many clinical states in which deficiency, or excess, of this ion may occur.

...Magnesium deficiency has been found in 84% of post- menopausal women...

...Magnesium deficiency can be present despite normal serum magnesium levels

... our normal range of serum magnesium is inaccurate and that serum magnesium levels at the lower end of normal likely suggest marginal magnesium deficiency. Indeed, ‘The magnesium content of the plasma is an unreliable guide to body stores: muscle is a more accurate guide to the body content of this intracellular cation...

...prevalence of normomagnesemic Mg deficiency in critically ill patients may be even higher (than 65%, my insertion) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypocalcemia, cardiac arrhythmias and other symptoms of Mg deficiency.

...Hypomagnesemia detected at the time of admission of acutely ill medical patients is associated with an increased mortality rate for both ward and medical ICU patients’. Magnesium depletion is present in about half of all ICU patients...

This perception is probably enforced by the common laboratory practice of highlighting only abnormal results. A health warning is therefore warranted regarding potential misuse of ‘normal’ serum magnesium because restoration of magnesium stores in deficient patients is simple, tolerable, inexpensive and can be clinically beneficial.

...After several weeks of strenuous physical activity, serum magnesium can increase with no change in erythrocyte magnesium levels despite a reduction in mononuclear cell magnesium levels. The authors of a study concluded that the reduction in mononuclear cell magnesium content ‘reflects a reduction in exchangeable magnesium body stores, and the onset of a magnesium deficiency state’. This study also indicates that just 6–12 weeks of strenuous physical activity can lead to magnesium deficiency. Another study concluded: ‘Serum and urinary magnesium concentrations decrease during endurance running, consistent with the possibility of magnesium deficiency. This may be related to increased demand in skeletal muscle’.

The article continues with an eye-opening discussion of dietary factors affecting magnesium status.

Dietary factors affecting magnesium status

‘Although magnesium intakes have been gradually falling since the beginning of the century, there were sharply increased intakes of nutrients that increased its requirements [particularly high vitamin D and phosphorus intakes]...The major source of phosphorus derives from soft drinks that contain phosphoric acid, the consumption of which has been rising markedly in the last quarter of a century’.

...Since 1940 there has been a tremendous decline in the micronutrient density of foods... in the UK for example, there has been loss of magnesium in beef (−4 to −8%), bacon (−18%), chicken (−4%), cheddar cheese (−38%), parmesan cheese (−70%), whole milk (−21%) and vege- tables (−24%).61 The loss of magnesium during food refining/processing is significant: white flour (−82%), polished rice (−83%), starch (−97%) and white sugar (−99%).12 Since 1968 the magnesium content in wheat has dropped almost 20%, which may be due to acidic soil, yield dilution and unbalanced crop fertilisation

Magnesium deficiency in plants is becoming an increasingly severe problem with the development of industry and agricul ture and the increase in human population’.Processed foods, fat, refined flour and sugars are all devoid of magnesium, and thus our Western diet predisposes us to magnesium deficiency.

... Increased calcium and phosphorus intake also increases magnesium requirements and may worsen or precipitate magnesium deficiency... The American diet is low in calcium and fiber as well as in magnesium, and high in protein and phosphorus’. Excess calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D may also lead to increased magnesium loss increasing magnesium requirements.

...patients with diabetes appear to be magnesium-deficient and magnesium deficiency likely increases the risk of diabetes.

Dietary aluminium may lead to magnesium deficit by reducing the absorption of magnesium by approximately fivefold, reducing magnesium retention by 41% and causing a reduction of magnesium in the bone. And since aluminium is widely prevalent in modern-day society (such as in aluminium cookware, deodorants, over-the-counter and prescription medications, baking powder, baked goods, and others), this could be a major contributor to magnesium deficiency.

A common misconception is that consuming phytate-rich foods can lead to nutrient deficiencies particularly magnesium depletion via binding by phytic acid. However, urinary magnesium excretion will drop to compensate for a reduction in bioavailable magnesium. And most high-phytate foods are also good sources of magnesium (grains and beans are good examples). Thus, it is unlikely that consuming foods high in phytate will lead to magnesium depletion. However, a vitamin B6-deficient diet can lead to a negative magnesium balance via increased magnesium excretion.

Supplementing with calcium can lead to magnesium deficiency due to competitive inhibition for absorption, and oversupplementing with vitamin D may lead to magnesium deficiency via excessive calcium absorption and hence increase the risk of arterial calcifications. Use of diuretics and other medications can also lead to magnesium deficiency.

Diagnosing magnesium deficiency is tricky, with long-term damage from deficiency. That’s why magnesium supplementation makes for a huge public health solution at very low cost— supplement and forget about the tests, which might be wrong anyway!

‘The existence of subacute or chronic magnesium defi- ciency is difficult to diagnose. Because the tissues damaged by magnesium depletion are those of the cardiovascular, renal and the neuromuscular systems, early damage is not readily detectable. It is postulated that long-term suboptimal intakes of magnesium may participate in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases of these systems’.

Magnesium deficiency is extremely hard to diagnose since symptoms are generally non-specific, there are numerous contributing factors, and there is no simple easy way to diagnose magnesium deficiency....

...This study suggests that a significant subclinical magnesium deficit, not detected by serum magnesium, was present in many of these healthy elderly subjects. Magnesium supplementation improved magnesium status and renal function’.

Consequences of magnesium deficiency can be severe.

Hypertension ‘Magnesium status has a direct effect upon the relaxa- tion capability of vascular smooth muscle cells and the regulation of the cellular placement of other cations important to blood pressure - cellular sodium:potassium (Na:K) ratio and intracellular calcium (iCa(2+)). As a result, nutritional magnesium has both direct and indirect impacts on the regulation of blood pressure and therefore on the occurrence of hypertension’.

Many patients with hypertension are treated with thiazide and loop diuretics, both of which deplete the body of magnesium, and giving patients with hypertension who are receiving long-term thiazide diuretics oral magnesium supplementation significantly reduces blood pressure. In fact, the high intracellular calcium induced by magnesium deficiency may induce both insulin resistance and hypertension.

...Low magnesium levels can promote endothelial cell dysfunction, potentially increasing the risk of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Magnesium deficiency also promotes a proatherogenic phenotype in endothelial cells. Hypomagnesaemia can impair the release of nitric oxide from the coronary endothelium, while magnesium therapy can improve endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with coronary artery disease.

...this makes magnesium supplementation a promising therapy in the treatment of hypertension and coronary artery disease.

Atherosclerosis

With my awful CT heart calcium score, atherosclerosis of my LAD is of keen concern to me. I want to at least halt the progression, if not reverse it lest I succumb as per my internist to a “heart attack within 7 years”.

My doctors wanted to give me a statin (poison). Why did they not even mention magnesium which should lower LDC and increase HDL?

Magnesium deficiency and magnesium depletion in soft tissues can cause calcifications in the heart, liver and skeletal muscles... magnesium deficiency damages the kidneys due to calcium deposits and may cause numerous electrolyte abnormalities... supplementing with magnesium has been found to improve endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease.

... eating a diet deficient in magnesium predisposes to atherosclerosis, calcification of the aorta, degeneration of myocardial muscle fibres and inflammatory connective tissue throughout the body...

Magnesium treatment for 3 months in patients with ischaemic heart disease increases the apolipoprotein A1:apolipoprotein B ratio by 13%, decreases the apolipoprotein B concentrations by 15%, and decreases very- low-density lipoprotein concentrations by 27%. Magnesium therapy also tended to increase high-density lipoprotein. The authors of the study concluded: ‘...magnesium deficiency might be involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease by altering the blood lipid composition in a way that disposes to atherosclerosis’.

In hypomagnesaemic kidney transplant recipients, magnesium supplementation significantly decreases total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol:high density lipoprotein ratio. Magnesium deficiency may enhance vascular endothelial injury, promoting the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

Magnesium deficiency may supersaturate bodily fluids with octacalcium phosphate calcifying soft tissues, whereas magnesium therapy may stop or even prevent soft tissue calcifications...magnesium deficiency predisposes to lipoprotein peroxidation and atherosclerosis...‘We conclude that the incidence of intracellular Mg deficiency in patients with cardiovascular disease is much higher than the serum magnesium would lead one to suspect, and may contribute to clinical cardiovascular morbidity

Considering that around 25% of all myocardial infarctions are not due to atherosclerotic plaque rupture, coronary artery spasm induced by magnesium deficiency may explain some of these events.

...Another study in postmenopausal women found that a low-magnesium diet (approximately 100 mg/day) can induce atrial fibrillation and increases glucose levels... dietary intake of magnesium or low magnesium levels can predispose to arrhythmias. Diuretics and digoxin also cause magnesium depletion, making the heart more susceptible to the development of arrhythmias.

...meta-analysis of 19 randomised trials using magnesium orotate found a significant reduction in first-degree mitral valve prolapse, grade 1 regurgitation, supraventricular and ventricular premature contraction, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

‘...low heart muscle magnesium may contribute to sudden death after myocardial infarction... Increasing the magnesium content of the diet may help to prevent ischemic heart disease, and there is already evidence that magnesium salts can have beneficial effects on established heart disease’.

...patients who have lower than normal magnesium concentrations in their heart muscle may be more likely to die suddenly after a myocardial infarction.

Administration of magnesium salts has been shown to reverse many of the changes in animal models of heart disease...There is also good evidence from some animal studies that pretreatment with magnesium salts protects against many of the changes in the heart caused by anoxia...’ In other words, consuming a diet high in magnesium may prevent the harms from an acute ischaemic events.

...Just 42–64 days on a diet low in magnesium (~101 mg/day) produced atrial fibrillation and flutter in three of five postmenopausal women (ages 47–75 years). Moreover, the arrhythmias responded quickly to magnesium supplementation.

In a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study on 350 patients with acute myocardial infarction, intravenous magnesium sulfate given immediately after completion of thrombolytic therapy significantly reduced all-cause mortality (3.5% vs 9.9%, P<0.01) and ventricular arrhythmias.

...Thus, magnesium may prevent thrombotic events and may also protect cardiac cells against ischaemia... All of these suggest that magnesium is an anti- thrombotic and antiplatelet agent and that magnesium deficiency may promote thrombosis. Furthermore, magnesium deficiency appears to be more prevalent heart disease, suggesting a need for magnesium treatment.

Conclusion

Smart move: it would be wise for everyone to supplement with a baseline amount of magnesium, for a major positive impact on world health.

Subclinical magnesium deficiency is a common and 19. under-recognised problem throughout the world. Importantly, subclinical magnesium deficiency does not mani fest as clinically apparent symptoms and thus is not easily recognised by the clinician.

Despite this fact, subclinical magnesium deficiency likely leads to hypertension, arrhythmias, arterial calcifications, atherosclerosis, heart failure and an increased risk for thrombosis. This suggests that subclinical magnesium deficiency is a principal, yet under-recognised, driver of cardiovascular disease.

A greater public health effort is needed to inform both the patient and clinician about the prevalence, harms and diagnosis of subclinical magnesium deficiency.

Which magnesium?

See Health and Vitality Start with getting Key Nutrients.


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SAR CoV2 aka COVID-19: CDC and WHO cognitive commitments in relying on 90-year-old science — Respiratory droplet size vs Masks

See all COVID-19 posts.

If you do not measure something properly, or lack the imagination to consider what might be possible, declaring the science settled is the worst kind of anti-science.

Yet this is precisely what the WHO and CDC did at the outset, and the WHO still sticks to its absurd position to this day.

Sciencemag.org: Reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2

...a large proportion of the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appears to be occurring through airborne transmission of aerosols produced by asymptomatic individuals during breathing and speaking (1–3). Aerosols can accumulate, remain infectious in indoor air for hours, and be easily inhaled deep into the lungs...

...In the case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), it is possible that submicron virus-containing aerosols are being transferred deep into the alveolar region of the lungs, where immune responses seem to be temporarily bypassed. SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to replicate three times faster than SARS-CoV-1 and thus can rapidly spread to the pharynx from which it can be shed before the innate immune response becomes activated and produces symptoms (6). By the time symptoms occur, the patient has transmitted the virus without knowing.

... In Wuhan, China, it has been estimated that undiagnosed cases of COVID-19 infection, who were presumably asymptomatic, were responsible for up to 79% of viral infections (3).

...The World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for social distancing of 6 ft and hand washing to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2 are based on studies of respiratory droplets carried out in the 1930s. These studies showed that large, ~100 μm droplets produced in coughs and sneezes quickly underwent gravitational settling (1). However, when these studies were conducted, the technology did not exist for detecting submicron aerosols. As a comparison, calculations predict that in still air, a 100-μm droplet will settle to the ground from 8 ft in 4.6 s whereas a 1-μm aerosol particle will take 12.4 hours (4). Measurements now show that intense coughs and sneezes that propel larger droplets more than 20 ft can also create thousands of aerosols that can travel even further (1). Increasing evidence for SARS-CoV-2 suggests the 6 ft WHO recommendation is likely not enough under many indoor conditions where aerosols can remain airborne for hours, accumulate over time, and follow air flows over distances further than 6 ft (5, 10).

...Given how little is known about the production and airborne behavior of infectious respiratory droplets, it is difficult to define a safe distance for social distancing... Ultimately, the amount of ventilation, number of people, how long one visits an indoor facility, and activities that affect air flow will all modulate viral transmission pathways and exposure (10). For these reasons, it is important to wear properly fitted masks indoors even when 6 ft apart. Airborne transmission could account, in part, for the high secondary transmission rates to medical staff, as well as major outbreaks in nursing facilities

...Masks also protect uninfected individuals from SARS-CoV-2 aerosols...

...From epidemiological data, countries that have been most effective in reducing the spread of COVID-19 have implemented universal masking...

WIND: the WHO and CDC and Surgeon General in effect caused the suffering and death of tens of thousands of people, based on the primitive mask science of 90 years ago. Not unlike the practice of modern medicine in every other area—dogmatic and unreceptive to contrary evidence.

What were these “experts” doing to understand droplet transmission in all the years since SARS/MERS broke out? It looks like cognitive bias including confirmation bias, cognitive commitments and rationalizations apply at least as much in the medical field as any other.

Wrecking ball policies have achieved little

So far we have destroyed the livelihood of 30 million or so people in the USA so that COVID-19 can remain a viable deadly threat to high-risk individuals. We now know that the death rate is a tiny fraction of what was assumed.

My prediction is that within a year or two more people will die because of misguided policies on COVID-19 than those infected by it. Lack of medical care for other things, lack of early detection, delays in surgery, spikes in suicide, deaths from mass economic damage, etc. And that is ignoring other needless suffering spawned by bad policy that does not result in death.

So we are kicking the can down the road on national and world policy when what we need to start doing is encouraging low risk people to get infected, while implementing considerably more efforts to protect high-risk people. COVID-19 will remain a serious hazard so long as most of the population can be infected semi-randomly according to risk. Leaders who are adults realize that risk assessment can call for tough decisions across multiple disciplines (far more than medical), which is why these medical organizations have no business declaring policy.

Economic carnage

A government-created split of “haves” and “have nots”: those who have maintained their income and those who have been reduced to poverty. This is not a “shared sacrifice”, but an immolation of an entire class of citizens while another class is either not affected financially or might even gain from it. Worst of all, minimally or entirely untouched salaries and benefits in the public sector are paid for by taxes taken from victims forbidden to work at the implicit point of a gun. That has been unspeakably regressively vicious. How will these people ever be fairly compensated?

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SAR CoV2 aka COVID-19: Wrecking Ball Public Policy Continues

See all COVID-19 posts.

The good news is that most lockdowns have now been lifted, and the recent riots might do us some good by telling us just how ridiculous or wise the lockdowns were, starting about a week from now in the areas with the riots.

...

So far we have destroyed the livelihood of 30 million or so people in the USA. Yet COVID-19 remains a viable deadly threat to high-risk groups. We have gained the knowledge that the death rate is a tiny fraction of what was assumed—we knew that a month ago and yet the policies of economic and medical carnage continued.

It is likely that within a year or two more people will die because of misguided policies on COVID-19 than those infected by it.

You heard that right: it is possible that more people may die without ever getting COVID-19 because of public policy: lack of early detection, delays in surgery, spikes in suicide, deaths from mass economic distress, etc. COVID-19 was and is a tiny fraction of total deaths in the population—a statistical blip in California.

We are kicking the can down the road on national and world policy when what we need to start doing is encouraging low risk people to get infected, while implementing considerably more efforts to protect high-risk people. COVID-19 will remain a serious hazard so long as most of the population can be infected semi-randomly according to risk.

Risk assessment calls for tough decisions across multiple disciplines. Medical “experts” are not qualified to decide public policy because they do risk assessment only within their own silo. Total risk includes medical issues and also economic and social issues.

The Have-Nots

A government-created split of “haves” and “have nots” was created and will be the legacy of public policy on COVID-19: those who have maintained their income (and many have increased their savings!) and those who have been reduced to poverty, with their savings drained and businesses shuttered, with some still facing legal repercussions for daring to want to earn a living.

This is not a “shared sacrifice”, but an immolation of an entire class of citizens while another class is either not affected financially or might even gain from it. Adding insult to injury, the minimally or entirely untouched salaries and benefits in the public sector are paid for by taxes taken from victims forbidden to work at the implicit point of a gun. it is unspeakably regressively vicious.

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Magnesium Supplementation: Brain, Lungs, Sleep, Urination — No Doubt It Works

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It, in particular, The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, MD, ND.

Update: see the June 7 2020 updated version of this post.

Recent experiences with magnesium follow below.

The prelude speaks to decades of needless suffering and harm. Shame on MDs who ignore nutritional deficiencies.

Prelude

Some readers might think my prior posts on health have been a bit too critical of doctors, to put it mildly. But the more I learn and prove to myself the reality that I was ill served by modern medicine, I am now thinking I was too kind.

So I am now doubling down: I assert that most doctors are grossly ignorant of nutrition and therefore incompetent because they fail to consider nutrient deficiency. Willful ignorance in the face of tends of thousands of studies rises to medical malpractice.

See: A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine

No organism can enjoy health when deprived of critical nutrients, yet this is precisely how modern medicine operates. I speak especially of magnesium deficiency, but also of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin K2 and a few others.

Shame on every doctor who fails to consider*, for example, magnesium for hypertension, blood sugar, migraines, neuropathy, neurological protection and repair, coronary artery calcification, and dozens of other conditions before resorting to dangerous drugs. Yes, all those things can result from magnesium deficiency and it is only one of many nutrients.

Not trained in nutrition and apparently uninterested in the health robustness that comes from proper nutrition, doctors as a group wallow in their ignorance and have become dispensers of poisons of many types (eg statins), with unjustified cognitive commitments and confirmation biases instilled in medical schools where “knowledge” is regularly debunked and studies are conflicting, barely plausible due to statistical manipulation to suit funding sponsors, and shot through with financial and ethical conflicts—but taken as the basis for one-size-fits-all guidelines which often are little better than quackery. Doctors now apply epidemiological pseuedo-science to individuals in so many areas even while ignoring critical nutritional requirements: “here are your drugs, you will never be cured, take them the rest of your life”. The whole pile reeks of intellectual and ethical bankruptcy.

Were I a doctor, I don’t know how I could look myself in the mirror until I thoroughly expanded my knowledge of nutrition, since everything in health rests upon it. If only 10% of my patients could be helped and perhaps cured by nutritional means, wouldn’t I have the strongest moral and ethical obligation to do so? And at the least, there can be no basis for overall health so long as the patient is deficient in key nutrients like magnesium. It seems that most doctors have a strong cognitive commitment that nutrition is mostly irrelevant, which in the context of health is a rationalization that causes real and serious harm.

It is a sad state of affairs for anyone with a health problem.

Recent experiences with magnesium supplementation

Correlation is not causation, but supplementing with a high grade magnesium supplement is about as risk-free as it gets and most of the population is deficient in magnesium (very poor food supply these days), so the smart move is to supplement.

Comments apply to magnesium supplementation was built-up over ~2 weeks to ~1500mg/day using magnesium citrate and magnesium L-Threonate.

Here I detail multiple health issues, and how magnesium has helped (or not).

Reflecting on many past health problems, I assert that magnesium deficiency was the likely cause in whole or at least in part. Everything I detail here is known by scientific study to be strongly correlated with magnesium deficiency yet not one doctor in 35 years ever has even mentioned magnesium to me.

* Or not tested-for, or tests known to be highly unreliable are used, e.g., serum magnesium test.

Asthma

Since I acquired asthma and allergies from a very bad viral infection at the age of ~21, I have had asthma that for the first 10 years or so after was quite bad. For the past 20 years, it has largely been a “treat as needed” thing with a prescription inhaler, set off by dust or allergies or cold.

Personal experience: magnesium supplementation has calmed my lungs down very effectively so much so that I have given up the prescription inhaler. Instead of the inhalre, I used 400mg magnesium citrate when needed, such as inhaling dust in very windy conditions. I can feel the bronchospasms ease and then go away within 30 minutes. This is at least as effective as the prescription inhaler, with no side effects I have noted.

Brain and memory

 

After a horrible time last year (lingering issues from concussion ), I resorted to a prescription stimulant for ADD and mental fatigue, lest I be financially devastated by an inability to focus or concentrate (months of very poor work are extremely discouraging, to say the least).

Personal experience: a year of that stimulant was critical. It helped with neurogenesis and brain repair, of that I am sure. But about 2 weeks after considerable magnesium supplementation, I now definitely have better brain function (attention span, alertness, concentration, etc). Not only that, I feel no desire for the stimulant (stopped it cold turkey for a week now, as I write this), though it remains to seen if I might still need it occassionaly for attentional problems (one of the lingering side effects of my concussion). OTOH maybe the magnesium will completely resolve attention issue. My memory also seems stronger and I am not forgetting things—a known benefit of magnesium.

There is considerable scientific support for magnesium being neuroprotective and neuro-repairative. And yet... none of my doctors never mentioned magnesium before or after my concussion (or ever). Not internists, not ER doctors, not neurologists. Such ignorance rises to medical malpractice, damaging me more and longer than necessary (years). Ditto for the neurologists and my peripheral neuropathy. Willful ignorance is at best a rationalization unworthy of any professional. Shame on all of them.

Muscle spasms

Muscle spasms (sometimes extremely painful) have been an ongoing problem for some years now, so much so that a prescription muscle relaxant was my only recourse. There is considerable science to support the effectiveness of magnesium for muscle relaxation and elimination of muscle spasms.

Personal experience: muscle spasms GONE and muscles more limber and flexible.

Irregular heartbeat

When highly trained in past years, I suffered an irregular heart beat (skipped beat, then extra powerful beat), so annoying that it would keep me from sleeping. I now believe it was caused by magnesium deficiency. To test that theory, I have to attain a comparable level of fitness.

Sleep

I’ve been suffering sleep quality issues ever since my concussion.

Personal experience: waking up less often, deeper sleep.

Frequent urination, difficulty urinating

Getting up to pee 5 to 10 times a night blows. That has been going on for years.

Personal experience: frequency is down to 2 to 3 times per night. Flow is much improved, steady and without problems. Maybe it might improve further but this is already a sea change. It is known that calcium can be deposited in the bladder (and elsewhere) due to inadequate magnesium, and in the bladder it results in the need for frequent urination.

Coronary artery calcification / atherosclerosis / cholesterol

This one will take longer to assess and requires therapeutic doses of magnesium via ReMag. At the least, I expect to see a halt to my coronary artery calcification — I was tested this year again and saw a troubling substantial year-over-year worsening vs last year. I hope for reversal and will know in one year when I get retested.

Night vision

This has been a problem for me in recent years, and getting worse.

Personal experience: I was able to see adequately last night using the light of only (roughly) half the moon while hiking back on an 18 mile hike.

Left chest wall pain/tightness

This issue is not cardiac in nature. It has been bad enough to disable me for part of a day with fatigue/pain.

Personal experience: diminishing, have hardly noticed in recent 10 days, no attacks.

Blood pressure

Has been generally good but variable from 116/68 to 130/84. I want to see a consistent 116/68 or so. I don’t have my blood pressure monitor along this trip, so this one is a TBD.

Immune system

Only time will tell. But last year’s nasty prostate infection which resulted in horrible malaise from the nasty antibiotics are not something I care to repeat

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Computer Display, iPhone, iPad and Similar of Concern for Eye Health? Macular Degeneration Linked to Blue Light (sunlight and most forms of LED lights)

See also eyesight and presbyopia and sunglasses and health and magnesium deficiency.

Use Apple’s “Night Shift” to Reduce Blue Light on Computer Display and iPhone, iPad

Love that iPhone or iPad or other phone or tablet or computer display? Long term, the blue light from cell phones and tablets and computer displays might have serious implications, and that’s no laughing matter, even if it takes 50 years for it to happen. It is particularly concerning since children from a very young age stare at cell phone or tablet screens for many hours. Excessive blue light is also linked to eyestrain and various health problems.

The Apple iMac 5K display and iPad and iPhone and similar displays can be run extremely bright, and looks to contain a lot of blue light. Use Night Shift and similar features even in the daytime.

Macular degeneration (retinal cell death) has been linked to blue light (380nm to 500nm). The term HEV (high energy visible) might also be heard. A sampler:

There is minimal scientific evidence yet that exposure to blue LED light will cause macular degeneration (leading to loss of vision) the same way sunlight does, short of artificially high exposure levels. It is a matter of intensity, duration of exposure, and almost certainly a complex interplay of personal factors (overall health, diet, genetics, etc).

Harvard Medical: Will blue light from electronic devices increase my risk of macular degeneration and blindness?

White LEDs may actually emit more blue light than traditional light sources, even though the blue light might not be perceived by the user. This blue light is unlikely to pose a physical hazard to the retina. But it may stimulate the circadian clock (your internal biological clock) more than traditional light sources, keeping you awake, disrupting sleep, or having other effects on your circadian rhythm.

...consumer electronics are not harmful to the retina because of the amount of light emitted. For example, recent iPhones have a maximum brightness of around 625 candelas per square meter (cd/m2). Brighter still, many retail stores have an ambient illumination twice as great. However, these sources pale in comparison to the sun, which yields an ambient illumination more than 10 times greater!

High-intensity blue light from any source is potentially hazardous to the eye. Industry sources of blue light are purposely filtered or shielded to protect users. However, it may be harmful to look directly at many high-power consumer LEDs simply because they are very bright. These include “military grade” flashlights and other handheld lights. Furthermore, although an LED bulb and an incandescent lamp might both be rated at the same brightness, the light energy from the LED might come from a source the size of the head of a pin compared to the significantly larger surface of the incandescent source. Looking directly at the point of the LED is dangerous for the very same reason it is unwise to look directly at the sun in the sky. Compared to the risk from aging, smoking, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and being overweight, exposure to typical levels of blue light from consumer electronics is negligible in terms of increased risk of macular degeneration or blindness. Furthermore, the current evidence does not support the use of blue light-blocking lenses to protect the health of the retina, and advertisers have even been fined for misleading claims about these types of lenses.

WIND: Science and especially medical science (pseudo science most of the time) have been wrong on so many things so often that “don’t worry” claims are best seen as a sucker’s bet. Scientific data to back up the claims about brightness of consumer devices not being harmful does not yet exist given the relatively short existence of modern displays. When used for long periods of time, particularly at night and for year after year starting at a young age, what then? With reasearch hardly begun, it is irresponsible to categorically reject any blue light hypothesis here in 2020.

Speculation about comparative risks and emphatic claims like “Blue light from electronic devices is not going to increase the risk of macular degeneration or harm any other part of the eye” without even mentioning nutritional deficiences and their role in health makes such claims dubious at best. Remember “masks don’t work” from both the CDC and WHO vs COVID-19? Categorically rejecting a hypothesis is anti-science.

The Effect of Blue-Light Blocking Spectacle Lenses on Visual Performance, Macular Health and the Sleep-Wake Cycle: A Systematic Review of the Literature

In summary, the findings of this systematic review indicate that there is a lack of high quality clinical evidence for a beneficial effect of blue‐blocking spectacle lenses in the general population to improve visual performance or sleep quality, alleviate eye fatigue or conserve macular health...

There is a need for high quality studies to address the effects of blue blocking spectacle lenses on visual performance, and the potential alleviation of symptoms of eyestrain and/or visual fatigue

WIND: small short-term studies vs macular degneration are not very persuasive.

Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes

... short-wave blue light with wavelength between 415 nm and 455 nm is closely related to eye light damage. This high energy blue light passes through the cornea and lens to the retina causing diseases such as dry eye, cataract, age-related macular degeneration, even stimulating the brain, inhibiting melatonin secretion, and enhancing adrenocortical hormone production, which will destroy the hormonal balance and directly affect sleep quality. Therefore, the effect of Blu-rays on ocular is becoming an important concern for the future. We describe blue light's effects on eye tissues, summarize the research on eye injury and its physical prevention and medical treatment.

The refractive medium of the human eye's different tissue characteristics have different permeation effects on light when the wavelength is <300 nm. A wavelength between 300 and 400 nm can penetrate the cornea and be absorbed by the iris or the pupil. High energy short wave blue light between 415 and 455 nm is the most harmful. Direct penetration of crystals into the retina causes irreversible photochemical retinal damage[1]. As the harmful effects of blue light are gradually realized by the public, eye discomfort related to blue light is becoming a more prevalent concern. Because of blue light's short wavelength, the focus is not located in the center of the retina but rather in the front of the retina, so that the long exposure time to blue light causes a worsening of visual fatigue and nearsightedness. Symptoms such as diplopia (double vision) and inability to concentrate can affect people's learning and working efficiency...

...screen reading can lead to the occurrence and development of poor eyesight in schoolchildren, and the higher incidence of nearsightedness correlates with the increase in the length of the screen reading time...

It seems likely that nutrition including magnesium deficiency would influence damage to and repair of retinal cells (and everything else in the body). Magnesium is an anti-oxidant and therefore a deficiency speaks directly to the statement in one of the studies: “oxidative damage caused by blue light was shown to be reduced by effective antioxidant extract associated-free radical elimination”.

Removal of the blue component of light significantly decreases retinal damage after high intensity exposure

[WIND: note “high intensity”—this study uses mice along with high intensity light to suggest that blue light might be a concern. But mice are not humans, and this level of exposure misleads more than helps and the last statement is very non-scientific, giving no relative exposure level versus the mice setup]

Light causes damage to the retina (phototoxicity) and decreases photoreceptor responses to light. The most harmful component of visible light is the blue wavelength (400–500 nm). Different filters have been tested, but so far all of them allow passing a lot of this wavelength (70%). The aim of this work has been to prove that a filter that removes 94% of the blue component may protect the function and morphology of the retina significantly...

In conclusion, this blue-blocking filter decreases significantly photoreceptor damage after exposure to high intensity light. Actually, our eyes are exposed for a very long time to high levels of blue light (screens, artificial light LED, neons…). The potential damage caused by blue light can be palliated.

White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model (emphasis added):

LED (or solid-state) lighting sources are designed to emit all energy within the wavelength range of human vision, making LEDs the most energy-efficient commercially manufactured light. However, many current “white-light” LED designs emit much more blue light than conventional lamps, which has a number of health implications, including disruption of circadian rhythms (Holzman 2010).

The most popular LED lighting product, a phosphor-conversion (PC) LED, is an LED chip that emits blue light, which passes through a yellow phosphor-coating layer to generate the ultimate white light (Spivey 2011). Although the white light generated from LEDs appears normal to human vision, a strong peak of blue light ranging from 460 to 500 nm is also emitted within the white light spectrum; this blue light corresponds to a known spectrum for retinal hazards (Behar-Cohen et al. 2011). Some epidemiological studies have suggested that short-wavelength light exposure is a predisposing cause for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (Wu et al. 2006). Animal models have also been used to determine that excessive exposure to blue light is a critical factor in photochemical retinal injury targeting photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) (Hafezi et al. 1997).

Things are often more complicated; tangled up in all this is the age factor: too little blue light can also be a problem, and age can be a mitigating factor of sorts because the lens of the eye yellows with age (yellow filters out blue). But if the damage accrues from youth to middle age, the yellowing lens is not of much help:

With age, the lens becomes more yellowish, and thus, the spectrum of blue light transmission dramatically decreases through the years. It is suspected that one reason older individuals experience sleep problems is the lack of blue light during the daytime.

Spectral transmission graphs

The closer the light wavelength is to ultraviolet (UV), the more damaging it becomes in general. This is true in general for skin cancer or killing viruses in water or degradation of plastics or paint or anything over time (just find any can or bottle that has been sitting in the sun for a long time). That’s because shorter wavelengths contain much higher energy levels (go beyond UV to X-Rays and killer gamma rays).

To assess UV/violet/blue exposure with a sunglass or contact lens, one would need a spectral transmission chart. Yet when I request spectral transmission charts no vendor has them, even first-class sunglass vendors like REVO. Statements like “blocks blue light” are presumably true, but ought to be backed up by hard 3rd-party evidence, that is, a spectral transmission chart showing just what is blocked—and this varies by the tint and coating of the lens used. Accordingly, I hope to actually measure the spectral transmission of sunglasses that I actually wear sometime soon.

Spectral transmission graph

The link between blue light and macular degeneration

In Macular Degeneration Linked to Sunlight and Low Antioxidants:

Some cases of age-related macular degeneration may arise from a combination of low plasma levels of antioxidants and exposure to blue light from the sun, a multinational European study suggested.

The combination more than tripled the risk of the eye disease among individuals with the lowest combined levels of antioxidants, Astrid E. Fletcher, Ph.D., of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and colleagues reported in the October issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

...

I’ve also spoken to an optometrist who regularly snapshots the retinas as part of eye exams, and he states (for my eyes and in general) that he has not observed any change in retina health in recent years. Thus theoretical lab tests are no subsitute for real-world scientific evidence as per retinal cells in human eyes, particularly given outdoor light exposure. That said, many of us spend many hours staring at bluish LED displays (cell phones, tablets, computer displays) and/or under LED or CFL lighting in the home or office.

The blue light from LEDs is now associated with retinal cell death. How much is too much is as yet unknown, but the evidence leaves little doubt that blue light kills retinal cells:

The relation between macular degeneration-retinal damage and exposure to light has been known since the middle of the 20th century. Nevertheless, in the last 5 years, the advent of new technology LED along with its massive use in screens of electronic devices (smartphones, tablets, laptops…) has made phototoxicity the main field of our research.

The studies conducted by the Complutense University of Madrid have shown that LED devices emit 5 times more toxic light than light reflected by paper or emitted by the older-style CRT monitors.

In-vitro experiments in which human donated retinal pigmentary epithelium cells were exposed to 36-hour circadian cycles of direct LED light of different intensities have been forceful: without protection, cell death amounted to 93%. However, when a protective element was placed between the cells and LED light, the survival rate of cells increased by 90%... Dr Sánchez-Ramos acknowledges that it may take another 10-15 years for research to demonstrate conclusively that LED light causes macular degeneration in the same way that sunlight does.

See also The Lowdown on Blue Light: Good vs. Bad, and Its Connection to AMD.

Nowadays, there's an increase in the use of digital devices and modern lighting—such as LED lights and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs)—most of which emit a high level of blue light. CFLs contain about 25% of harmful blue light and LEDs contain about 35% of harmful blue light. Interestingly, the cooler the white LED, the higher the blue proportion. And by 2020, 90% of all of our light sources are estimated to be LED lighting. So, our exposure to blue light is everywhere and only increasing... Who's going to need the most protection? Those who have high exposure to white LED or fluorescent light bulbs in offices and homes, frequent users of LED computer monitors, tablets, or smart phones, and those at risk for AMD, particularly those at high risk, (those with family history, smokers, etc.).

UV-blocking contact lens

Assessing the risks, protection

Given the lack of nailed-down scientific evidence, one has to make a personal assessment weighing the factors. But there are reasonable precautions to take, even ignoring the macular degeneration theory—sunglasses and blue-light-cut eyeglasses in particular.

Many companies are pushing solutions such as eyeglasses with blue-light-cut coatings, so the vested interests involved need to be considered. That said, blue light filtering eyeglasses might reduce eyestrain and this is easy enough to assess for anyone working at a computer for hours every day. Such solutions are thus appropriate to try, particularly if there is any evaluation period offered.

In my personal case, 10-12 hours daily computer usage seems to put me at high risk, which concerns me greatly. However, I don’t know how much blue light my LED computer displays emit, and I have no basis for knowing whether the risk is zero or something very significant.

Nor do I understand if configuring my NEC professional displays to run slightly warm (yellow) would reduce the risk (I would expect it would).

While I wear UV-blocking contact lenses* as well as sunglasses when outdoors, it’s not clear to me that my contact lenses block blue/violet light at all as when using a computer display. If they did so effectively, it would interfere with my assessment of color balance for photographs. So I suspect that I have no protection for computer work using just contact lenses.

* The Accuvue web site states that “UV-absorbing contact lenses are NOT substitutes for protective UV-absorbing eyewear such as UV-absorbing goggles or sunglasses because they do not completely cover the eye and surrounding area”.

I do a lot of cycling, and high quality sunglasses are very important to me. Hiking at extreme altitude is also considerations. At the least, high quality sunglasses are no-brainer for both comfort and eye protection. See my experience report with the Revo Guide S sunglasses at WindInMyFace.com.

Revo Guide S polarized sunglasses, Open Road lens

Change the display

Professional displays offer the option of custom calibration, so that a display can be set to, say, 5000°K instead of the typical 6500°K. This is one solution that should greatly reduce the amount of blue light.

CLICK TO VIEW: Professional Displays


Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

WSJ: “A Low-Carb Strategy for Fighting the Pandemic’s Toll”

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It.

Federal guidelines in league with the medical establishment guidelines have been injuring and killing people for decades now; the horrible results are evident in the raging epidemics of obesity, heart disease, cancer and just about everything.

Funding for studies that would really improve public health by strengthening the organism as a whole (e.g. nutrtion and eliminating nutrient deficiencies) are rarely if ever done, because there is no funding for improving the health of 300 million people when it is not a drug that can be patented. The government and BigPharma and medical schools and doctors are all complicit in this highly unethical situatinon.

Could a change be slowly emerging?

WSJ: A Low-Carb Strategy for Fighting the Pandemic’s Toll

Federal dietary guidelines don’t reflect the evidence that eating fewer carbohydrates can help to reduce obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

The coronavirus has added a brutal exclamation point to America’s pervasive ill health. Americans with obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other diet-related diseases are about three times more likely to suffer worsened outcomes from Covid-19, including death. Had we flattened the still-rising curves of these conditions, it’s quite possible that our fight against the virus would today look very different.

To combat this and future pandemics, we need to talk about not only the masks that go over our mouths but the food that goes into them. Next month, an expert committee will issue its advisory report on the federal government’s official dietary guidelines for the next five years. First published in 1980, the guidelines are meant to encourage healthy eating, but they have self-evidently failed to stem the ever-rising rates of obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases in the U.S.

Pills and surgery can treat the symptoms of such conditions, but diet-related problems require diet-related solutions. The good news is that changes in diet can start to reverse these conditions in a matter of weeks. In one controlled trial at the University of Indiana involving 262 adults with Type 2 diabetes, 56% were able to reverse their diagnosis by following a very low-carbohydrate diet, with support from a mobile app, in just 10 weeks. The results of this continuing study have been sustained for two years, with more than half the study population remaining free of a diabetes diagnosis.

...

Yet the federal government’s dietary guidelines themselves stand in the way of making low-carb diets a viable option for the 60% of Americans with at least one chronic disease. That’s because the guidelines call for a diet high in grains, with more than 50% of calories coming from carbohydrates. The guidelines aren’t mere advice: They drive the National School Lunch Program, feeding programs for the elderly and the poor, and military food. Many patients learn about the guidelines from their doctors and dietitians... To date, government experts overseeing the dietary guidelines have refused to publicly consider low-carbohydrate alternatives.

... the current committee, whose report is due in June, stated recently that it couldn't find a single study with carbohydrates below 25% of calories. In response, an advocacy group called the Low-Carb Action Network published a list of 52 such trials. One reason that the committee missed these studies is that it decided to exclude all trials on weight loss, even though two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese.

... The reason is that the dietary guidelines focus solely on disease prevention in healthy people. Congress mandated in 1990 that the guidelines should address the “general public,” and in that year, most Americans did not have diet-related conditions. Now a majority of them do, yet federal officials have stated their reluctance to expand the scope of the guidelines.

... The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) warned, in a 2017 report mandated by Congress, that “it will…be essential for the [dietary guidelines]…to include all Americans whose health can benefit by improving their diet…. Without these changes, present and future dietary guidance will not be applicable to a large majority of the general population.”

...

—Ms. Teicholz is a science journalist and the executive director of the Nutrition Coalition.

WIND: sadly, not one word on nutrient deficiency, which is the flip side of the ydiet/nutrition.

On my recommended reading list, see The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet by Nina Teicholz.

translate “experts” to “ethically bankrupt players with conflicts of interest” and you will be closer to the mark when it comes to government committees. And why is the government involved at all? It guarantees intellectual corruption.

Any time a committe is involved, it is all but certain that its recommendations will be evasive, watered down and disingenuous. Key studies and findings will be hidden, or just left out if they might the money boat.

But maybe it will move things in the right direction.

Why change diet when you can prescribe a profitable drug that doctors are all but mandated to prescribe by the guidelines, a drug that will not cure the patient but one that will usually cause other problems, and thus require still more profitable drugs? It’s a fantastic situation for drug companies and keeping that appointment calendar fully booked.

See A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine and Loserthink in Modern Medicine: Goal-Oriented instead of Systems-Oriented.

Reader Comment: “I went off statins. Feel much better”

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It.

See in particular: The Great Cholesterol Con by Dr. Malcom Kendrick and The Truth about Statins and The Great Cholesterol Myth: Why Lowering Your Cholesterol Won't Prevent Heart Disease - and the Statin-Free Plan That Will and others.

Veganism as referenced below—I also have a vegan daughter (one of three), and I worry that she is not getting proper nutrition just because it is difficult to get certain nutrients, like Vitamin K2 and magnesium and Vitamin A. And because there is plenty of misinformation out there on how vegans can replace everything with vegetable sources—very hard to do even without being a vegan. The smart move would be to check for nutrient deficiency, such as an magnesium RBC test for magnesium deficiency. Whether or not accurate tests for Vitamin K2 and Vitamin A exist, I don’t know.

Reader Gary J writes:

My vegan cancer-survivor middle-aged daughter has been advising me.

I went off statins. Feel much better. I had most unpleasant muscular aches after outdoor activities like cycling and photography.

Photography for me is an aerobic activity like the hunting I did as a kid in rural Washington State. Muscular aches are gone.

WIND: magnesium supplemenation might work as well or better than a statin, with no side effects (diarrhea aside, use ReMag to avoid that), and numerous other benefits. You can take a statin which is literally poisonous to numerous functions of your body, or you can increase total health with nutritional means.

Muscle aches means muscle damage and are a warning sign that other systems in the body are also being steadily degraded. The reason you need regular liver function tests is to rule out liver damage—but every system in the body is steadily damaged by statins and the damage can be cumulative and irreversible. We are talking about a significant possibility of permanent damage, whether it is 3 months or 3 years or right away, it is Russian Roulette with your total health.

Studies have shown that doctors fail to report 75% of side effects from statins, dismissing and ignoring patient complaints. This is grossly unethical and fundamentally undermines the health of everyone, but there it is*.

Statins are recomended for lifelong use. Ask your doctor for any large double blind study of statin use lasting 5 years or longer—you won’t find any. Insist on a a web URL of the study so s/he cannot wave you off with vague claims.

Higher cholesterol for men at 70 and beyond is generally protective in terms of overall mortality and function, while statins are associated with increased mortality in that age group. You heard that right: past a certain age, statins increase your chances of dying, let alone all the other problems they cause. And there is no plausible evidence that statins do anything for women of any age other than that statins poison women.

Statins are a toxic blockbuster money-making group of drugs that degrade every system in the body by reducing one of the most critical building blocks the body needs for virtually everything. Educate yourself and save your life. See the statin books on my suggested reading list noted above.

Statins are based on a debunked cholesterol hypothesis, that hypothesis (never casaully proven!) being repeated as a mantra while ignoring the real causes. Statins are the greatest and most terrible medical fraud in history*. Groupthink and one-size-fits-all guidelines based on corrupt and fraudulent science without even checking for the basics—nutrient deficiency.

The sordid history of statins is a tale of junk science, cognitive bias, financial and ethical corruption backstopped by bodies like the government, and the American Heart Association, which will endorse almost anything as heart healthy, if paid enough money.

The real reason for heart disease is NOT cholesterol (it is an innocent bystander), but almost certainly inflammation together with oxidized cholesterol caused by nutrient deficiency exacerbated by other factors, like environmental pollution and excessive carbohydrate intake. The “low carb” idiocy (long debunked) is still foisted on the public by the medical establishment and government. These policies are literally injuring and killing millions of people. But have no fear—once your body is badly screwed up, you can take a statin, which your doctor will tell you that you must do.

* I know from personal experience just how ruthlessly lazy and professionally/ethically incompetent doctors can be in reporting even extremely serious side effects (see Metronidazole).

** The medical establishment is degrading the lives of tens of millions of people with stations, giving them diabetes (up to 3X increase), polyneuropathy ( up to 27X increase), cognitive damage, strokes (greatly increase risk due to weakened cell walls), etc. With rare exception, such side effects are brushed aside as improbable (an indefensible anti-scientific assertion), with little or no risk assessment being done, as I know from personal experience with three doctors proposing that I use statins, particularly given my personal history of neuropathy and mTBI and my extreme exercise levels.

Grotesquely unethical medical “care”:

The medical malpractice of failing to correct key nutrient deficiencies like magnesium deficiency before proscribing dangerous drugs is the rule.

Since magnesium deficiency is strongly associated with coronary artery calcification, high blood pressure, heart attacks, etc, we have one of the most grotesquely unethical situations in modern medicine: prescribe an expensive poison for lifelong use before even bothering to check that basic nutritional needs are being met.

Furthermore, most statins and many other pharmaceuticals further deplete magnesium, leading to a downward spiral of more and more drugs. Thus statins not only degrade all systems in the body directly, statins actively deplete a critical nutrient—slow acting poison.

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Magnesium Intake Is Inversely Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification

Read the books that may save your life; see Your Doctor is NOT Responsible for Your Health—YOU Are! Recommended Reading to Open Your Mind and Ask the Right Questions, Because Your Life Depends On It, in particular, The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, MD, ND.

Calcium and magnesium in balance are critical. Today’s modern food supply is magnesium-poor and the majority of the population is magnesium deficient. Too little magnesium, and excess calcium (very common) has to end up somewhere and lo—it will precipitate out within the body—such as arteries. Vitamin K2 deficiency is nearly the rule as well, and it is mandatory to carboxylate proteins that allow calcium to enter into bones.

With magnesium deficiency running rampant, it is rarely if ever tested by 99.9% of doctors, or if it is tested-for it is done with a highly misleading test (serum magnesium) instead of an magnesium RBC test (the best test is ionized magnesium but it is not available to the public).

Correlation is not causation. And epidemiological and observational studies can be bunk. But there are thousands of other studies that show magnesium deficiency is strongly tied to hundreds of medical issues and strong evidence that reversing magnesium deficiency can cure all sorts of medical issues.

Magnesium Intake Is Inversely Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification

We observed strong, favorable associations between higher self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake and lower calcification of the coronary arteries, an important, discriminating measure of subclinical atherosclerotic burden that has been shown to reclassify risk of CVD morbidity and mortality.

Our observations suggest that future research may consider magnesium's effect on CAC to be a potential physiological mechanism through which dietary magnesium mitigates risk of stroke, non-fatal MI, and fatal CHD. In addition to further research on magnesium in relation to the number and density of calcified lesions, and calcified and noncalcified plaque burden, prospective research is also required to elucidate magnesium's relationships with these and other sites of vascular calcification, as well as the possible benefits of magnesium supplementation in inhibiting onset and progression of atherosclerosis and calcification, with the goals of identifying magnesium's mechanism of action in lowering the risk of future cardiovascular events, and ultimately lowering the burden of cardiovascular disease.

.. The main finding of this study is that in individuals free of clinically apparent CVD, higher self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake, estimated by food frequency questionnaire, is associated with lower levels of CAC, a sensitive, discriminating measure of subclinical CVD and overall burden of atherosclerosis. Those with the highest self-reported total magnesium intake had approximately one-half the odds of having any detectable CAC, compared to those with the lowest intake, which suggests magnesium intake may have a protective role in inhibiting calcification initiation. The observed associations with CAC were significant after adjusting for a range of cardiometabolic risk factors and potential mediators, as well as after further adjusting for AAC levels, suggesting that magnesium may be acting specifically in the coronary arteries over and above its other known anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antidyslipidemic functions to affect calcification (7–9).

These irresponsible researchers cannot bring themselves to say “magnesium deficiency is common, magnesium supplementation has numerous benefits and is safer than any drug, and dozens of major health issues might be solved by effective dietary supplementation with regular deficiency testing”. Instead these researchers punt, and call for more research (more money for them?) while tens of millions of people have a high probability of positive health outcomes with appropriate magnesium supplementation. Damn them and their ilk for letting millions of people suffer and die because of their callous fucking cowardice to say something meaningful for public health.

The researchers say other heartless callous things, like this:

Longitudinal studies followed by randomized trials will be necessary to confirm the relationship between magnesium intake and calcification.

This doesn’t pass the sniff test for medical ethics: why would any caring responsible person allow someone to remain magnesium deficient?

It is a given that no organism can function with full health when deprived of essential nutrients. So why would anyone competent, responsible or caring not FIRST ensure that key nutrients like magnesium are present in the body in adequate amounts BEFORE prescribing dangerous and expensive drugs? That is in fact how modern medicine operates, a status quo as unethical as it is dangerous.

Failing to test for nutrient deficiency before prescribing heavy-duty drugs is the modus operandi of modern medicine, which has been a huge failure with so many common diseases. It is now more than fair to say that medical malpractice is the norm, and proscribed by official guidelines. Follow the money.

My calcified heart

I have a right to be pissed off at incompetant ignorant doctors: my CT heart calcium scan giving me a miserably bad coronary artery calcification score is most likely the result of being magnesium deficient as an extreme endurance athlete. It is highly unlikely that all that calcium in my coronary arteries could not have precipitated if enough magnesium had been present.

...moderate coronary artery calcification centered within the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Quantitative calcium score provided by the 3D Lab is 91.2, which places the patient in the 81st percentile for age and gender

Hope for halting and maybe reversal

Therapeutic doses of magnesium might actually be able to reverse coronary artery calcification, since magnesium keeps calcium in solution and is antagonistic to calcium, as well as being reuqired for up to 800 enzymatic reactions in the body.

Hence I intend to use therapeutic doses of magnesium via ReMag for the next year. I will have another CT heart calcium scan a year from now in 2021 to determine whether whether I have reversed (at least partially), or at the minimum halted the calcification in my coronary arteries.

The point is not that the calcification and other problems were caused by magnesium deficiency (that can never be proven in retrospect), the point is that magnesium deficiency was all but certain given my intensive exercise and multiple symptoms of magnesium deficiency (for example severe muscle cramps after my events). I reported those to the doctors and not one doctor ever brought up magnesium in 30 years. Incompetent idiots.

Putting it plainly: every doctor I’ve seen is so ignorant and incompetent as to basic nutritional requirements that not one of them ever suggested magnesium testing or supplementation.

This is NOT a gray area—to ignore nutritional needs this basic is horrible medical malpractice, particularly in light of flippantly recommending heavy-duty poisons like statins to me (due to the calcification and spite of zero other risk factors). There are thousands (if not tens of thousands) of studies showing that magnesium deficiency is associated with hundreds of different health issues, both medical and physical. But... you cannot patent magnesium supplementation and doctors learn next to nothing about nutrition in medical school.

Doctors, before prescribing heavy-duty drugs, check for nutritional deficiences, particularly magnesium, with the right tests. Anything else is medical malpractice. If you disagree or assume otherwise, you are engaging in professional malfeasance via rationalization and confirmation bias and cognitive bias and outright nutritional ignorance. If you think the science is unproven, then pause for a moment to consider that failing to test for deficiency in perhaps the most critical nutrient of all is as anti-scientific as it gets. Shame on you.

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A Prescription for Harm: the Modus Operandi of Modern Medicine

Most of the population is already deficient or highly deficient in key things, like magnesium, Vitamin D3, Vitamin K2, and others.

It is a given that no organism can function with full health when deprived of essential nutrients. So why would anyone competent, responsible or caring not FIRST ensure that key nutrients like magnesium are present in the body in adequate amounts BEFORE prescribing dangerous and expensive drugs? That is in fact how modern medicine operates, a status quo as unethical as it is dangerous.

Do doctors test for these critically important nutrients? Vitamin D sometimes, magnesium deficiency and Vitamin K2, almost never. Magnesium deficiency in particular is associated with hundreds of maladies, including coronary artery calcification.

So here is how modern medicine works. Repeat for every medical problem with different specialists, never connecting the dots when the true root cause is a simple nutrient deficiency, such as magnesium deficiency.

How medicine works today

To keep this simple, I’ll speak to magnesium deficiency:

  1. Patient arrives with common disease. Run standard and mostly useless tests. Do NOT test for magnesium deficiency as that isn’t in the guidelines.
  2. Inform patient of the need to take a powerful drug to fix the issue, a drug that in many cases might actually directly make the problem worse e.g., drugs with fluorine which permanently bind magnesium and thus exacerbate magnesium deficiency.
  3. The drug doesn’t help and it causes other problems, so prescribe more drugs which in turn exacerbate magnesium deficiency even more. The patient now has 3/4/5/10 drugs which are likely to have at least some side effects. Things are not any better, but the guidelines have been followed.
  4. Inform patient that s/he is pretty much fucked (in so many words) and that s/he will have to take all these drugs for the rest of their life, since the condition is not improving. The meta message becomes “hope is gone, you are hopelessly damaged and you have to keep popping pills, or face a high chance of dying”.
  5. Keep collecting your payments for doing your job irresponsibly. Repeat ad nauseum.

That’s pretty much how it works today.

Alternative

  1. Evaluate patient for signs of nutrient deficiencies (doctor: go back to school, learn about nutritional deficiencies and stop injuring your patients by your laziness and ignorance).
  2. If any signs of likely nutrient deficiencies are present, take all possible measures to fix those deficiencies along with accurate tests as needed (doctors: know what tests are bunk, and use the right tests).
  3. If after verifying that all nutritional deficiencies have been addressed, then and only then resort to pharmacology.

Doctors, if this is too hard for you (guidelines, insurance, time, etc), get the hell out of the field and stop hurting people.

Ultra Endurance Exercise: Nutrient Deficiency in Magnesium, Iodine, Iron, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Chromium?

Most of the population is already deficient or highly deficient in key things, like magnesium, Vitamin D3, Vitamin K2, etc.

My working theory (with a considerable amount of science to support it, albeit unfocused science) is that not just some but MOST health issue derive from nutrient deficiency. Pile on insults to the body like high sugar consumption and trans fats, and a myriad of poor health outcomes can be expected from an organism with nutrient deficiency—insult to injury is Bad News. Isn’t it obvious just how poor the health of people is today in the USA in particular? Just walk into any Walmart and it’s a very sad state of affairs to witness.

My hit-and-miss performance

I’ve been an ultra endurance athlete for around 11 years now. During that time I have had on-days and off-days, never quite sure why, but pretty sure it had to do with nutrition.

When things are working well, I am highly competitive in my age group, such as in my decisive solo win (no drafting) in the 2015 Central Coast Double highland route—an exceptional day for me—and I don’t why it all came together so well. If only I could extract that kind of performance every time. Heck, that kind of high-grade performance would be awesomely satisfying even 1/3 of the time—so why have’t I achieved that, ever? It’s more like 1 in 10 at best, and that is not satisfactory.

Tailwind Nutrition sports drink endurance fuel

Many of my doubles (not all), I had gut distress but when I switched to Tailwind for my double centuries, all of my gut distress issues went away for the past 15 or so double centuries, never to return.

So clearly the stuff I had been using for the first 37 or so doubles was not a good choice for me and the Tailwind has been beneficial, and I think it is the electrolyte mix in it. Also, the severe muscle cramps are gone now with Tailwind, supporting the idea of electrolyte depletion now being solved. But a symptom averted does not mean it is enough for optimal performance or optimal health or recovery.

I also wonder whether, at 14mg per serving, Tailwind has partially offset magnesium deficiency due to exercise, since I typically use 3 servings per 1L of water, so that’s 52g magnesium in just one 1L water bottle in the form of Magnesium Citrate, which is alleged to have about 60% bioavailability—quite good, though a far cry from ReMag. It would mean that my consumption of 7 to 12 liters in a double century would be Mg supplementation of 364g to 624g over the course of the double—probably enough to offset all losses. While the prior product I used also had magnesium (“chelate”, unspecified molecule), it also contained Xylitol and I could never tolerate it towards the end.

Nutrient deficiency in athletes

I’ve been looking at how to maximize recovery and performance so as to have a “good day” reliably. A key step in that process is looking at nutrient deficiency in a host of elements, which are heavily depleted by intensive training and especially during double centuries. I am pretty sure that most of my issues revolve around deficiencies, which impair recovery, lung function, metabolism, and brain function too.

I came across this summary article which tends to confirm my suspicions—there is no way that even the best diet could replace enough of what is lost by intensive exercise, particularly magnesium which is highly deficient in the modern food supply—one just cannot eat enough to get enough of some nutrients, certainly not under extreme exercise loads. Ditto for iodine and other key elements.

Plus, a deficiency in just one element can screw up the critical balance within cells and with numerous metabolic processes. For example, too little magnesium relative to calcium can lead to calcification of the body especially arteries, which might explain my miserable coronary artery calcium score. Moreover, therapeutic magnesium levels might actually be able to reverse coronary artery calcification.

The Effect of Exercise and Heat on Mineral Metabolism and Requirements

Prolonged strenuous exercise can result in marked changes in chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, and zinc metabolism. Evidence of these changes can persist for several days after the exercise is discontinued. Some of the observed changes in plasma mineral concentrations may be attributed in part to an acute-phase response, which occurs as a result of tissue trauma or stress. Reductions in plasma mineral concentrations may also in part reflect an increased loss of these minerals from the body via urine and sweat. The increased rate of mineral loss that occurs in sweat with exercise is amplified by the simultaneous exposure to hot temperatures.

Given the above observations, the following questions emerge: do endurance-associated changes in mineral metabolism result in some or all of the following:

  • a compromised endurance capacity?
  • a compromised immune defense system?
  • a compromised antioxidant defense system?
  • a slower rate of recovery from injury?

Additional work on the influence of prolonged exposure to strenuous exercise and heat is urgently needed. The influence of diet on the above changes in mineral metabolism, or whether dietary manipulations may attenuate some of the negative consequences of these changes, is an area of research that needs to be expanded.

Reading the paper, note well the blood serum levels of nutrients are a very poor way to gauge nutrient deficiency, since they gyrate wildly for many reasons. A good example of this is magnesium, 99% of which is stored in body tissues. So blood serum tests are scientific garbage when it comes to assessing deficiency of key minerals, and why (for example) a magnesium RBC test is far superior.


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